Nov 25, 2020  
2020-2021 Graduate Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Graduate Catalog

College of Law


University of North Texas at Dallas College of Law General Catalog*

Catalog goes into effect at the beginning of the Fall 2020 semester.

Program requirements are subject to necessary corrections.

*Subject to change


 

 



 

About the Catalog


This catalog is an official bulletin of the UNT Dallas College of Law. It includes policies, regulations, procedures, and information in effect at the time of release.

The provisions of this catalog are intended to provide general information and do not constitute a contract, express or implied, between UNT Dallas College of Law and a student, an applicant for admission, or other individual. Although the catalog contains policies, regulations, procedures, and fees in effect at the time of publishing, information provided in this catalog is subject to change. The College of Law reserves the right to change any provision of this catalog at any time and without notice. Changes will become effective whenever determined by the appropriate College of Law official and may apply to both prospective students and those currently enrolled. Every effort will be made to keep students advised of any such changes. Information on such changes will be available in the Office of the Registrar. It is the responsibility of each student to be aware of College of Law rules, regulations, policies, and current graduation requirements for particular degree programs.

The online version of The University of North Texas at Dallas College of Law Catalog is the official version. The online catalog will be updated periodically and will contain all major policy changes that occur during the 2020-2021 catalog cycle. Although this catalog was prepared on the basis of the best information available at the time, and the information is updated regularly, users are cautioned about the following:

  • Editorial, clerical, and programming errors may have occurred in the publication of this website, and The University of North Texas at Dallas College of Law assumes no responsibility for such errors.
  • There is a lag time between approved changes and their publication on this website.

Students are held individually responsible for complying with all requirements of the rules and regulations of the University and the Board of Regents of The University of North Texas System. Failure to read and comply with policies, regulations, and procedures will not exempt a student from whatever penalties the student may incur.

Students are urged to read this catalog carefully. This catalog does not include all of the College of Law rules, regulations, and policies for which a student is responsible. Students also should consult other publications, such as the Student Handbook, the Honor Code, the Code of Student Conduct, and other specific policies or contracts. This catalog becomes effective on the first day of the fall term/semester, 2020.

The Policies of the UNT Dallas College of Law supersede any inconsistent information published in this catalog or any other College of Law publication. These are available on the College of Law’s website as well as on the UNT Dallas website.

If you have questions about catalog content or how to use the catalog, please contact the Office of the Registrar at the University of North Texas at Dallas College of Law.

 

Accreditation


 

American Bar Association


UNT Dallas College of Law is provisionally approved by the American Bar Association’s Council of the Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar. Provisional accreditation is effective June 3, 2017. Graduates of a provisionally approved law school are considered by the ABA to be graduates of an ABA-approved law school and are eligible to sit for most state bar exams, including in the State of Texas.

 

The Accreditation Process


The national accrediting body for U.S. legal education is the Council of the American Bar Association’s Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar. The standards and process for accreditation are set out in the ABA Standards and Rules of Procedure for Approval of Law Schools. These standards and procedures, as administered by the Council, are aimed at ensuring the quality and professionalism of law schools.

The ABA requires a new law school to successfully complete its first academic year operating a full-time program of legal education before applying for provisional accreditation. The College of Law began its first academic year in fall 2014 and filed its application for provisional accreditation in fall 2015.  Graduates of a provisionally approved law school are considered by the ABA to be graduates of an ABA-approved law school and are eligible to sit for most state bar exams, including in the State of Texas.

Once a school gains provisional approval, it remains on provisional status for at least three years during which time it is monitored closely by the Council. Under the ABA Standards, a provisionally approved law school may apply for full approval no earlier than two years after receiving provisional approval and must obtain full approval within five years after receiving provisional approval.

Having received provisional approval, the College of Law will work hard to establish that it is in full compliance with the ABA Rules and Standards in order to become fully approved by the ABA. Of course, we cannot guarantee that the College of Law will achieve full approval by a particular date.

 

Our Commitment


The UNT Dallas College of Law will seek full approval according to the timeline and requirements of the ABA. Under the ABA Standards, a provisionally approved law school cannot apply for full approval for two years after it receives provisional approval and must obtain full approval prior to expiration of the five-year provisional approval status. This means the UNT Dallas College of Law may apply for full approval on or before March, 2021.   The Dean and administration of the UNT Dallas College of Law are committed to devoting the necessary resources, and in other respects, taking all appropriate steps to provide a program of legal education that will qualify for full approval by the ABA. The College of Law does not make any representation to any applicant that it will be fully approved by the ABA before the graduation of any matriculating student.

Questions concerning ABA accreditation may be directed to the Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar, American Bar Association, 321 N. Clark Street, Chicago, IL 60654 or call (312) 988-6738.

 

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC)


The UNT Dallas College of Law initially was a professional school of the UNT System. In July 2013, UNT Dallas received separate regional accreditation from the SACSCOC. In 2015, UNT Dallas College of Law and UNT Dallas gained SACSCOC approval to modify the scope of UNT Dallas to include the College of Law. September 1, 2015 is the effective date of the merger between UNT Dallas and the UNT Dallas College of Law. After the merger, UNT Dallas College of Law falls within the scope of the SACSCOC accreditation of UNT Dallas. Hence, UNT Dallas is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC) to award baccalaureate, masters, and doctoral degrees. Contact SACSCOC at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call (404) 679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of The University of North Texas at Dallas.

 

Diversity and Equal Opportunity


The UNT Dallas College of Law seeks to create an atmosphere of openness and tolerance and to maintain work and education environments that offer equal opportunity. Individuals within the College of Law community are unified by the purposes of learning and professional development and by values of respect for human worth and dignity. The College of Law encourages and supports open discussion, rational resolution of conflict, and discussion and examination of values and ethics.

Discrimination and harassment based on individual differences such as race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, disability, veteran status, or sexual orientation in its educational programs, activities, admission, or employment practices is inconsistent with the College of Law’s mission and educational goals. Harassment is defined as an unwelcome action directed at a person or group of persons because of race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, disability, veteran status, or sexual orientation that adversely affects a term, condition, or privilege of the work or educational environment.  Individuals who work, study, live, and teach within this community are expected to refrain from behavior that threatens the freedom, safety, and respect deserved by every community member and to comply with federal and state equal opportunity laws and regulations. Such compliance is required by College of Law policy, and is a baseline from which our community works to assure fairness and equity to all who pursue their educational and professional goals here.

For further detail, please consult UNT Dallas Policy 5.002


 

 

About UNT Dallas College of Law


 

History and Location


The UNT Dallas College of Law is a public law school authorized by the State Legislature of Texas through legislation passed in 2009. The College of Law enrolled its first class in fall 2014. Initially, the College of Law was a professional school within the UNT System. On September 1, 2015, the College of Law became a professional school within UNT Dallas. The College of Law offers the Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree. The student body includes a day program of approximately 70-90 students, and an evening program of approximately 30-40 students.

The UNT Dallas College of Law’s downtown campus includes its primary location at the UNT Dallas Law Center - the historic Old City Hall at 106 S. Harwood Street - as well as the Lee F. Jackson Building, just a half-block away at 1901 Main Street. A unique partnership has transformed the historic Old City Hall into the new home of the UNT Dallas College of Law, while maintaining significant historic elements dating back to the building’s inception in 1914, as well as the events of President John F. Kennedy’s assassination in 1963. The neighboring Lee F. Jackson Building, also a historic renovation, houses the law library.

 

Mission


The mission of the UNT Dallas College of Law is to promote justice and advance human potential through the enterprise of legal education. Supporting this mission are six goals: {1) to broaden access to an affordable legal education; (2) to graduate students who have the full range of practice-related competencies necessary to be effective lawyers worthy of client and public trust; (3) to provide the best possible educational environment for learning the law and developing professional identity; (4) to advance the career and professional goals of our students; (5) to improve access to justice for underserved legal needs; (6) and to be a valuable partner in civic engagement with the City of Dallas and the North Texas region.

 

UNT Dallas College of Law


 

Professor and Dean

A. Felecia Epps

Visiting Professor and Interim Associate Dean for Academic Affairs

Peter Alexander

Assistant Dean, Office of Career and Professional Development

Courteney Harris

Lecturer in Law and Assistant Dean for Law Library

Edward T. Hart

Assistant Dean, Admissions and Scholarships

Nicole M. Gibbs

Assistant Dean for Academic and Financial Services and Law Registrar

Karen M. Jarrell

Director of Integrated Marketing and Communications

Victor McGlothlin

Assistant Dean of Student Affairs

Kevin W. Robinowich

Professor of Practice and Director Academic Success and Bar Readiness

Preyal Shah

Assistant Professor and Director of Legal Writing

Christine Tamer

Professor and Director of Experiential Education

Cheryl B. Wattley

 

Faculty Roster


UNT Dallas College of Law 2020-2021 Faculty

Information subject to change after June 1, 2020 posting date

A B C | DE F | G H | I J | K | L M | N O P | Q | R S T | U V W | X | Y | Z

 

A

Alexander, Peter 


Visiting Professor and Interim Associate Dean of Academic Affairs

  • BA, Southern Illinois University Carbondale
  • JD, Northeastern University

 

C

Conway, Shannon


Professor of Practice and Assistant Director of Academic Success and Bar Readiness

  • JD, Catholic University of America - Columbus School of Law

 

Crockett, Matt 


Assistant Professor of Law

  • BS, University of New Orleans
  • JD, California Western School of Law

 

D

Downes, Angela


Professor of Practice and Assistant Director of Experiential Education

  • UG, Mercer University
  • JD, Texas Wesleyan School of Law

 

E

Epps, A. Felecia


Dean and Professor

  • BA, Cornell College
  • JD, Creighton University School of Law

 

F 

Frase, Laura


Assistant Professor

  • BA, Rhodes College
  • MA, Southern Methodist University
  • JD, St. Mary’s University School of Law

 

Furgeson, Honorable Royal


Dean Emeritus and Founding Dean of the College of Law

  • BA, Texas Tech University
  • JD, The University of Texas School of Law

 

H 

Hackard, Gretchen


Professor of Practice and Director of Externship Program

  • JD, University of Houston School of Law

 

Hart, Edward 


Lecturer in Law and Assistant Dean for Law Library

  • BA, Valdosta State University
  • MS, Simmons College
  • JD, New England School of Law

 

J 

Jacobson, Loren


Assistant Professor of Law

  • BA, Yale University
  • M.Phil., Cambridge University
  • JD, Columbia Law School

 

M 

Maslanka, Michael


Assistant Professor of Law

  • BS, Cornell University
  • JD, Tulane Law School

 

Masso, Christina


Legal Writing Advisor

  • BJ, The University of Texas
  • JD, The University of Texas School of Law

 

O

Owsley, Brian


Assistant Professor of Law

  • BA, University of Notre Dame
  • JD, Columbia University of Law

 

P 

Perkins, Thomas


Assistant Professor of Law

  • BA, Harvard University
  • JD, Loyola University School of Law

 

Porterfield, Eric


Assistant Professor of Law

  • BA, The University of Texas
  • JD, Baylor University Law School

 

Pryor, Ellen


Professor of Law

  • BA, Rice University
  • JD, The University of Texas School of Law

 

S

Shah, Preyal


Professor of Practice and Director of Academic Success and Bar Readiness

  • BA, Austin College
  • M.Ed., The University of Texas
  • JD, St. Mary’s University School of Law

 

Sotelo, Gabriela


Professor of Practice

  • BJ, The University of Texas
  • JD, Texas Southern University Thurgood Marshall School of Law

 

 

T 

Tamer, Christine


Assistant Professor of Law

  • BA, Baylor University
  • JD, The University of Texas School of Law

 

W 

Wattley, Cheryl Brown


Professor of Law and Director of Experiential Education

  • AB, Smith College
  • JD, Boston University School of Law

 

Westenskow, Meijken


Professor of Practice and Assistant Director of Academic Success and Bar Readiness

  • BA, Brigham Young University
  • JD, Georgetown University Law Center

 

Contact Information


UNT Dallas College of Law Campus Contacts

 

Admissions

Mailing address:
106 S. Harwood Street
Dallas, TX 75201
Phone: 214-752-5981

 

Career and Professional Development

Mailing address:
106 S. Harwood Street
Dallas, TX 75201
Phone: 214-243-1785

 

Community Lawyering Center - Downtown at CityWalk

Mailing address:
511 North Akard Street
Dallas, TX 75201
Phone: 214-855-7892

 

Community Lawyering Center - Frazier

Mailing Address:
4716 Elsie Faye Heggins Street
Dallas, TX 75210
Phone: 469-351-0024

 

Community Outreach

Mailing Address:
106 S. Harwood Street
Dallas, TX 75201
Phone: 214-243-1773   

 

Financial Aid

Mailing address:
106 S. Harwood Street
Dallas, TX 75201
Phone: 214-752-5711

 

Law Library

Mailing Address:
1901 Main Street
Dallas, TX 75201
Phone: 214-243-1775   

 

Main Office

Mailing address:
106 S. Harwood Street
Dallas, TX 75201
Phone: 214-752-5959

 

Registrar

Mailing address:
106 S. Harwood Street
Dallas, TX 75201
Phone: 214-752-5973

 

Student Life and Student Affairs

Mailing Address:
106 S. Harwood Street
Dallas, TX 75201
Phone: 214-243-1788

 

Tuition, Expenses, and Financial Aid 

Mailing address:
106 S. Harwood Street
Dallas, TX 75201
Phone: 214-752-5973

 

 

Law Library


The Law Library occupies the full sixth floor of the UNT System’s Lee Jackson Building, covering more than 20,000 square feet. Completely redesigned and renovated, the facility emphasizes collaborative work and study rooms, effective access to and use of digital and print information, and individual study and research rooms.

The Law Library’s services include workshops, one-on-one research guidance, online teaching modules, multiple research guides, and teaching sessions for courses in the first year and beyond.

Bound volumes in the core federal collection include the United States Code, United States at Large, Code of Federal Regulations, and United States Reports.

Bound volumes in the core Texas collection include Vernon’s Texas Statutes and Code Annotated, Texas Cases, Texas Administrative Code, Texas Jurisprudence 2d, the Texas Practice Series, and other significant secondary soures on Texas law.

The library also has online subscriptions for students and faculty to WeslawNext, Lexis Advance, Bloomberg Law, Hein Online, Bloomberg BNA, Fastcase, and LLMC, as well as other electronic sources.

 

 

Admissions


 

General Information


The College of Law admits first-year law students, beginning with the first semester of law school in the fall semester. The Law School will accept applications beginning on or around September 1st of each year. The deadline to accept applications will be April 30th. Students will be admitted on a rolling basis.  The College of Law also admits transfer and visiting students.

The College of Law seeks students with the desire and ability to become excellent legal professionals. The College of Law also seeks to enroll a diverse student body with a variety of perspectives, experiences, and viewpoints that will enhance the education of all its students.

 

Requirements and Application Process


All applicants are required to take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) and register with the Credential Assembly Service (CAS). A four-year degree from a regionally, accredited undergraduate school is required of every applicant prior to matriculation at the College of Law. The application deadline is April 30th, but applicants are strongly encouraged to submit all required documents by January 15th. Admission offers are made on a rolling basis.

The Admissions Committee acts only on complete applications containing all required components. Applicants typically receive a decision within 6 to 8 weeks from the date the application is complete.

Completed applications must contain the following:

  • Completed and signed online application. (Note: There is no application fee.)
  • Personal statement. The personal statement should provide the Admissions Committee with insight into the applicant’s abilities, motivation, and experiences, and why he or she wishes to obtain a law degree at the UNT Dallas College of Law. The personal statement should be double-spaced, no more than three pages, with a font size no smaller than 12 point.
    • Resume. The resume should provide detail about any significant vocational, extracurricular, or community activities; graduate work or degree; honors and awards; any service in the Armed Forces; job descriptions and major areas of responsibility, along with location (city and state) and dates of employment; publications; and other information that the applicant believes the Admissions Committee should consider in evaluating the applicant. The resume should not exceed three typewritten pages and 12 point font size.
  • Addendums. Any addendums necessary in response to answers on the application.
  • CAS Report. A complete CAS report includes:
    • LSAT score. All applicants are required to take the Law School Admissions Test and submit a reportable score that is not more than three years old, based on the entry date of admission to the UNT Dallas College of Law. The highest LSAT is considered for admission.
    • Transcripts. A copy of transcripts from all post-secondary  institutions (including graduate credits, professional credits, transferred credits, and internationally earned credits).
    • Letters of Recommendation. A minimum of two letters of recommendation (in addition to the evaluations noted above).  No more than 3 letters will be accepted. Letters must be submitted using the LSAC Letter of Recommendation Service.

 

Review of Applicants


Offers to applicants in the admission pool will be made with the goal in mind of enrolling a class that is both academically qualified and broadly diverse. Through its holistic review, the Admissions Committee will assess an applicant’s demonstrated ability to complete our legal program. The personal statement, resume, addendums, letters of recommendation, LSAT score, and UGPA provide the Admissions Committee with information to make such an informed assessment. The College of Law values inclusion and is committed to enrolling a diverse student body. 

 

 

Costs, Financial Aid, Billing, and Payment 


A core goal of the UNT Dallas College of Law is keeping tuition and student debt low for all students, to an extent consistent with meeting its educational goals. The organized bar and legal educators agree that the cost of legal education poses concerns for the profession and for legal education. High costs and debt loads reduce access to legal education, are often spread unevenly in relation to financial need, and shrink the horizon of opportunity.

 

Tuition and Fees for Academic Year 2020-2021


Tuition and fees for UNT College of Law in 2020-2021 are listed below for day and evening students. Rates for each vary by resident and non-resident students.

 

Day Program Resident Students Matriculating in 2020

  • Annual tuition (fall and spring semesters): $19,306.13.
  • Day students can expect required class hours of 15 per semester; expected tuition thus will be $19,306.13.
  • Includes Incidental Fees of: $718.00 in the fall semester and $659.00 in the spring  semester.

 

Evening Program Resident Students Matriculating in 2020

  • Annual tuition (fall and spring semesters): $13,603.83.
  • Evening students can expect required class hours of 12 per semester: expected tuition thus will be $13,603.83.
  • Includes Incidental Fees of: $718.00 in the fall semester and $659.00 in the spring semester.

 

Day Program Non-Resident Students Matriculating in 2020

  • Annual tuition (fell and spring semesters): $32,275.60.
  • Day non-resident students can expect required class hours of 15 per semester; expected tuition thus will be $32,275.60.
  • Includes Incidental Fees of: $718.00 in the fall semester and $659.00 in the spring  semester.

 

Evening Program Non-Resident Students Matriculating in 2020

  • Annual tuition (fell and spring semesters): $22,389.60
  • Evening non-resident students can expect required class hours of 12 per semester; expected tuition thus will be $22,389.60
  • Includes Incidental Fees of: $718.00 in the fall semester and $659.00 in the spring semester.

 

Incidental Fees Include:


  • Lawyering Fundamentals Course Fee (Fall only)
  • Library Fee
  • Medical Services Fee
  • Bar Prep Fee

 

Lawyering Fundamentals Course Fee Includes:


  • Meyers -Briggs Testing/Report Materials
    (For Entering 1Ls First Semester Only)

 

Library/Technology Fee Includes:


  • Subscriptions to:
    • Lynda (Online Learning Platform)
    • West Academic (Online Study Aide)
    • Canvas (Learning Management System)
    • ExamSoft (Exam Management System)
  • Technology Equipment (Student Use)
  • iClicker (First Semester Purchase)

 

Student Service Fees Include:


  • Mandatory Fees are assessed for university-related services available to currently enrolled students.
  • Student Service Fees are charged at $10.00 per credit hour, with a maximum charge of $250/semester.
  • Student service fees are assessed in proportion to the number of semester credit hours for which a student registers.
  • Student service fees cover the cost of student services that directly involve or benefit students, including but not limited to:
    • Cultural Entertainment Events
    • Health and Medical Services
    • Recreational Activities
    • Student Government

 

Transcript Service:


A transcript is an official document of the permanent academic record maintained by the College of Law Registrar’s Office. The permanent academic record includes all UNT Dallas College of Law courses attempted, all grades assigned, and degrees received. Official transcripts and certifications of student academic records are issued by the College of Law Registrar’s Office for all students.

Transcripts are $5.00 per copy. No incomplete or partial transcripts, including only certain courses or grades, are issued.

Transcripts cannot be released unless the student has satisfied all financial and other obligations to the University. A student may request his or her official transcript online at https://lawschool.untdallas.edu/office-registrar (“Order Transcripts” link).  The College of Law Registrar’s Office does not issue unofficial transcripts. Unofficial transcripts can be obtained in the myLAW student portal. Telephone and email requests are not accepted.

Cost of Attendance


For any given student, his or her total cost of attending law school includes the tuition and fees that the student pays, plus the student’s expenses (living and education-related expenses). All law schools provide a statement of “Cost of Attendance (COA). This statement is the school’s estimate of the total cost of attendance (tuition, fees, and living expenses) for the period of enrollment. Schools provide a statement of COA for two reasons. First, even if a student is not receiving any financial assistance such as loans, a student can make use of the COA in estimating and budgeting costs for law school. Second, governmental and private loans are based on, among other things, the COA. The current statement of the COA for the College of Law appears on the College of Law website.

 

 

Scholarships


 

Institutional Scholarships - Entering Students


UNT Dallas College of Law automatically considers all admitted applicants for a one-time, non-renewable entering student scholarship applied to tuition and fees for a student’s first year of enrollment. No awards are made for summer enrollment. Scholarship amounts are based on available funds in a given admissions cycle. Admitted applicants will be notified by the Office of Admissions if selected to receive an entering student scholarship along with instructions on how to accept the award.  For additional questions, contact the Office of Admissions at 214.752.5981.

The following criteria will be considered:

  • An applicant’s academic record, including previous undergraduate and graduate institutions
  • The socioeconomic background of the applicant while the applicant was an undergraduate student, including any change in that background
  • Whether an applicant would be the first generation of the applicant’s family to attend or graduate from a law school, and
  • The applicant’s involvement in community activities and public service.

 

Institutional Scholarships - Continuing Students


Institutional Scholarships are offered and administered by the UNT Dallas College of Law. Scholarship opportunities may be posted during the fall or spring semesters, or during both semesters.

 

External Scholarships


External Scholarships are offered and administered outside of the UNT Dallas College of Law.  We publish external scholarship opportunities as scholarship providers contact the law school. Many other external scholarship opportunities may be found through other resources and online searches.

 

No Conditional Scholarships


In accordance with ABA standard 509(b)(3) disclosure requirements, UNT Dallas Collage of Law does not offer conditional scholarships. “Conditional Scholarship” means any financial aid award, the retention of which is dependent upon the student maintaining a minimum grade point average or class standing, other than that ordinarily required to remain in good academic standing.

 

Tuition and Fee Payment


Credit card payments (MasterCard, Visa, and Discover) and check payments may be made through self-service at the myLaw student portal. Tuition and fee payments also may be made by personal check, money order, or cashier’s check. The student identification number must be recorded on all check and money order payments made in person.

Bills are not mailed for registration. Account balances and schedule information may be obtained through self-service at the myLaw student portal.

 

Cash Payments


Cash payments are not accepted. Please do not mail cash payments.

 

Installment Payment Plan


The Texas Legislature has the authority to modify or eliminate installment payment of tuition at each regular or called legislative session.

The UNT Dallas College of Law provides for the payment of tuition and fees during the fall and spring terms/semesters through the following alternatives:

  • Full payment of tuition and fees upon registration or by the payment deadline for early registration;

or

  • Selection of the installment plan. By selecting the installment plan, the student understands that the installment plan is a contractual agreement and he or she agrees to make the installment payments by the due dates indicated.

Tuition and fees must be paid in full for each registration period or by the payment deadline for early registration. Tuition payment by installment is not offered during the summer.

 

Non-Refundable Fees for Tuition by Installment


Handling fee: $20

Note: A $20 non-refundable handling fee will be charged to the student’s account each semester the installment plan is selected.

A student who fails to make payment of tuition and fees (including any incidental fees) by the due date may be prohibited from registering for classes until full payment is made. A student who fails to make payment prior to the end of the semester/session may be denied credit for the work done that semester/session. Financial Aid funds will not cover the handling fee.

See the academic calendar for each semester for installment payment deadlines.

 

Student Financial Obligation Agreement


Each semester, prior to registering for classes, students are required to accept the Student Financial Obligation Agreement. For additional information, each student should check his or her online student portal.

 

 

Tuition and Fees Refund Policy


 

Fee Adjustments for Courses Dropped and Added


A student may drop courses during the first 12 class days of a fall or spring semester (first four class days of a summer session). However, between the 6th and 12th class days, students may only drop classes with permission of the Associate Dean. A student may add courses during the first 7 class days of a fall or spring semester. Full refunds will be given for courses dropped during these periods, provided the student remains enrolled in at least one class. Refunds will not be issued for withdrawn classes after the 12th class day (Census Day). Any credit balance on a student account as a result of dropping courses will not be refunded until after the Census Day. As of the first day of the semester, students may not use the drop/add process to drop all of their courses, but instead must go to the College of Law Associate Dean for Academic Affairs to initiate withdrawal or leave of absence.

 

Withdrawal from the College of Law


Once the College of Law has accepted payment for tuition and fees, a student is considered officially enrolled unless otherwise restricted from enrolling.

Stopping payment on a check for tuition and fees or allowing the check to be returned unpaid by the bank for any reason does not constitute official withdrawal. The withdrawal process is done through the office of the College of Law Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. A withdrawal form will be issued by the Registrar, explaining the process to withdraw from the College of Law. Failure to follow procedures for withdrawing from the College of Law may result in financial penalties and delays with future enrollment. Once a student registers, he or she is responsible for the total fees assessed regardless of whether the installment option is used. Refund percentages are applied to total fees assessed and not the amount paid. This means that students who withdraw before paying all installments may, in the event of withdrawal, still owe the College of Law.

Calculation of tuition and fee refunds due to withdrawal are based on all charges the College of Law has assessed the student. Any credit balance on a student account as a result of officially withdrawing from the College of Law may be held for 30 days after the official withdrawal date. The reason for the delay is so that all charges may be totaled from various departments and applied to the refund.

 

Tuition and Fee Adjustments


Tuition and fee adjustments shall be made to students officially withdrawing from the University for charges listed below according to the following refund schedule:

 

Fall and Spring Semester

Time Period

Refund

By 5 p.m. on the last business day before the first day of the semester

100 percent

During the first five class days of the semester

80 percent

During the second five class days of the semester

70 percent

During the third five class days of the semester

50 percent

During the fourth five class days of the semester

25 percent

After the 20th class day of the semester

None

 

Summer Session of more than five weeks but less than 10 weeks

Time Period

Refund

By 5 p.m. on the last business day before the first day of the semester

100 percent

During the first three class days of the summer session

80 percent

During the second three days of the summer session

50 percent

After the seventh day of class for the summer session

None

 

Financial Aid

Satisfactory Academic Progress


In institutions of higher education, students must maintain “satisfactory academic progress” (SAP) to remain eligible for financial aid from federal, state, institutional, and some private sources. In addition, the UNT Dallas College of Law expects students to make satisfactory academic progress toward the J.D. degree. The requirements of SAP supplement and do not supersede other academic policies, such as policies relating to probation and dismissal.

 

Timing and Requirements


Students will be evaluated with respect to SAP at the end of each semester. To maintain satisfactory academic progress at the College of Law, students must meet the following requirements. These requirements apply to all day and evenin students, whether or not the student is receiving financial aid:

  • Minimum Cumulative GPA students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.3 or higher.
  • Complete greater than two-thirds of cumulative attempted credits. Students must successfully complete greater than 66 percent of their cumulative attempted credits.
  • Maximum time for completion of program. Students must complete their law degree requirements within 150 percent of the normal time to completion.

 

Failure to Meet SAP; Appeal Process


A student who fails to meet satisfactory academic progress is placed on financial aid suspension. A student on financial aid suspension is not eligible to receive financial aid unless the student successfully appeals the financial aid suspension.

A student may appeal his or her financial aid suspension on any of the following grounds: personal illness or injury; death of a relative; or other circumstances that affected the student’s ability to meet the requirements of satisfactory academic progress. To appeal the financial aid suspension, a student should obtain and complete the appeal form and materials, and submit them before June 1 (for summer term) or before August 1 (for fall term). The appeal form will be available on the website.

An appeal might be denied, granted, or granted upon the condition that the student will follow a specified academic plan. If the appeal is granted or granted with an academic plan condition, the student will receive a probationary term.

 

Academic Calendars, Policies, and Procedures


 

Academic Calendars


The Registrar’s Office is committed to providing information for a seamless law school experience. Vital information such as the academic calendar, the registration and enrollment policies and information, and the class schedule come directly from the Registrar’s office.

 

Academic Standing


For students matriculating in 2014 or 2015: If a student who is on academic probation does not reach a cumulative GPA of 2.000 by the end of the next regular semester, the student will be academically dismissed.

For students matriculating in 2016 or after: If a student who is on academic probation does not reach a cumulative GPA of 2.300 by the end of the next regular semester, the student will be academically dismissed. (This does not apply to students who are academically dismissed under the provision for Academic Dismissal After First Semester.)

 

Dismissal after First Semester


After the first semester of the first-year of studies at the College of Law, any student (whether full-time or part-time) whose grade point average is less than 1.700 will be academically dismissed. This dismissal is final. There is no appeal of the dismissal, and the dismissal is not subject to any petition for an additional semester on probation. 

 

Academic Probation


At the end of any semester in which the student is not in good academic standing as set out under the subsection on Academic Standing, the student will be placed on academic probation. (This does not apply to students who are academically dismissed under the provision for Academic Dismissal After First Semester.) Any student who is on academic probation will meet with the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs or his or her designee. (Another member or members of the faculty, administration, or staff might also attend the meeting as appropriate.) The purpose of the meeting will be to develop an academic success plan to maximize the student’s chances of avoiding academic dismissal and improving academic success beyond that level.

 

Academic Dismissal


If a student who is on academic probation does not reach good academic standing by the end of the next regular semester, the student will be academically dismissed. (This does not apply to students who are academically dismissed under the provision for Academic Dismissal After First Semester.) A student who is academically dismissed is not eligible to be enrolled in the College of Law.

Once a student has been academically dismissed, the Registrar will notify the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs. The Associate Dean will then notify the student of his or her status by written communication that will become a part of the student’s academic record. The written communication shall include:

  1. Whether the student is eligible to petition to continue on probation or to petition for readmission
  2. The time limit, if any, on such petitions
  3. That any such petition must be submitted to the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs
  4. An enclosure or attachment of applicable College of Law policy

If a student is enrolled in one or more courses when dismissed, the Registrar shall withdraw the student from the course(s). The Associate Dean’s notification to the student of an academic dismissal shall also provide notice that a student enrolled in any course will be immediately withdrawn from the course and if the student is withdrawn prior to Census Day, will be entitled to a full refund, and if after Census Day, pursuant to UNT Dallas’s refund policy.

A student who has been academically dismissed after probation and has a grade point average above a 1.7 may petition for eligibility to continue on probation, petition for readmission, or may petition for both. A petition for eligibility to continue on probation requests that the academically dismissed law student be allowed to continue his or her law school education while on academic probation for another semester. A petition for re-admission requests that the academically dismissed law student be allowed to begin his or her law school education again as a 1L.

 

Petition for Eligibility to Continue on Probation


A student who has received notice of academic dismissal may submit, to the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, a Petition for Eligibility to Continue on Probation.  Such a petition must be filed within thirty (30) calendar days after the student has received notice from the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs of academic dismissal.

Students should not assume or expect that the petition will be granted. This is not for punitive reasons, but because it is not fair or appropriate to allow students to continue a course of study in which they are not likely to be successful. A petition may be granted only if the student establishes the following: (1) that the student’s inability to remain academically eligible resulted from exceptional circumstances; (2) that the circumstances resulting in the student’s academic suspension have been remedied and will not prevent the student from attaining academic good standing; (3) that the student is capable of attaining good academic standing; and (4) that the student complied with the requirements of the academic success plan developed after probation. The Committee may set conditions for the student’s continued enrollment on probation, including but not limited to reduction in course work and specific academic success programming.

A student’s petition must include any and all supporting documentation that the student would like the Academic Standards Committee to consider and that would support the Committee finding that the student has established all four factors required to have the petition granted. For this reason, the petition should include any Academic Success Plan documents the student can obtain. The Academic Standards Committee will likely review some or all of the petitioner’s Academic Success Plan documents, including in particular any documents showing whether the student complied with any Academic Success Plan. The petition should include the number of hours worked during each semester in attendance at the UNT Dallas College of Law. This listing of documents and information in support of a student’s petition is not exclusive. The student bears the burden to supply the Academic Standards Committee with documents and information sufficient to demonstrate the student meets the criteria to continue or resume his or her studies at the UNT Dallas College of Law. 

A successful petition may result in one of the following:

  1. The student continues his or her studies on academic probation for an additional semester or for a period of time determined by the Committee. In such a case, the student will be required to retake all required courses in which the student received a grade of F.
  2. The student retakes all courses, including courses in which the student did not receive a grade of F.

In addition, the Academic Standards Committee may set conditions for the student’s continued enrollment, including reduction in course work and specific academic success programming. The decision to continue a student on academic probation must be approved by a simple majority of the voting members of the Committee.

 

Petition for Re-Admission to the College Of Law


If a student has been academically dismissed from the College of Law and seeks readmission to the College of Law, the student may not seek admission through the regular Admissions process. Rather, such a student may return to studies at the College of Law only by filing, with the Academic Standards Committee, a Petition for Re-Admission.  Students should not assume or expect that the petition will be granted. This is not for punitive reasons, but because it is not fair or appropriate to allow students to take a course of study in which they are not likely to be successful. A petition may be granted only if the student establishes the following: (1) that the student’s academic dismissal resulted from exceptional circumstances; (2) that the circumstances resulting in the student’s academic dismissal have been remedied and will not prevent the student from maintaining academic good standing; (3) that the student is capable of maintaining good academic standing; and (4) that the student complied with the requirements of the academic success plan during the time they were in law school.

A student’s petition must include any and all supporting documentation that the student would like the Academic Standards Committee to consider and that would support the Committee finding that the student has established all four factors required to have the petition granted. For this reason, the petition should include any Academic Success Plan documents the student can obtain. The Academic Standards Committee will likely review some or all of the petitioner’s Academic Success Plan documents, including in particular any documents showing whether the student complied with any Academic Success Plan. The petition should include the number of hours worked during each semester in attendance at the UNT Dallas College of Law. This listing of documents and information in support of a student’s petition is not exclusive. The student bears the burden to supply the Academic Standards Committee with documents and information sufficient to demonstrate the student will succeed at the UNT Dallas College of Law.  If the petition is granted, the Committee may set conditions for the student’s enrollment, including limits on course hours and specific academic success programming. Before re-admission, however, the Committee must determine that the applicant has satisfied the then-current admission requirements for applicants who previously attended law school in addition to the requirements identified above. The Committee’s decision to readmit a student must be unanimous. 

Procedures

  1. Once a student has submitted to the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs a Petition for Eligibility to Remain on Probation or a Petition for Re-Admission, the Associate Dean shall forward the petition to the Registrar and shall notify the Chair of the Academic Standards Committee that a petition has been submitted.
  2. As soon as reasonably possible, the Chair of the Academic Standards Committee shall schedule a meeting of the Academic Standards Committee to consider any petition or petitions that have been submitted. Once the meeting has been scheduled, the Chair shall notify the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs and the Registrar of the date and time of the meeting.
  3. The Registrar shall then assemble a package of materials for each student who has submitted a petition, including the petition with supporting documentation; the student’s law school transcript; and the student’s LSAC report. The Registrar shall provide this package of materials to the members of the Academic Standards Committee at least 3 business days before the Committee meets to consider the petition. Upon receiving the package of materials, the Committee may request additional information from the Registrar and/or the student.
  4. No later than five business days prior to the meeting to consider a dismissed student’s petition, the Chair of the Academic Standards Committee, with assistance from the Registrar, shall contact all of the student’s professors for the courses the student took during the semester after which the student was academically dismissed in order to offer them an opportunity to provide input as to the student’s academic performance and ability to meet the criteria for the grant of the petition.
  5. When the Committee meets it shall consider the student’s petition and all supporting documentation provided by the student, the materials provided by the Registrar, and any input provided by the student’s professors from the previous semester. Because the process may be anxiety-provoking for students and in order to maintain the efficiency and objectivity of the Committee, the Committee will make its decision without the personal appearance of the petitioner. The Committee thus encourages petitioners to provide fulsome information and thorough documentation to support a petition. The decision of the Committee is final and there is no reconsideration or appeal of its decision.

 

 

Attendance


Under College of Law policy and consistent with ABA Standards, the College of Law requires regular and punctual class attendance. Attendance will be taken in all classes.

 

Minimum Attendance Threshold 


Under College of law policy, in all courses, students must attend at least 80% of class sessions. However, in counting absences for purposes of this minimum attendance rule, absences based upon observance of a religious holy day or on a call for active military service will not be counted.

“Attendance” refers to attending the entire class session.  A faculty member may treat a tardy, or an early departure, or leaving and returning to class, as equivalent to an absence or a fractional part of an absence, provided that notice of the practice is provided to students during the first week of class.

If a student accumulates greater than the allowed number of absences, the student will be withdrawn from the course.

 

Excused Absences


If an absence qualifies as an “excused absence” and the reason for the absence prevents timely completion of assignments or work, the instructor will provide a reasonable time after the absence for the student to complete the work or assignment or an alternative assignment. Note: An excused absence will still count towards the minimum attendance rule, unless the absence fits in Category 1 or 2 and is addressed in accordance with UNT Dallas College of Law Policy on student attendance.

The categories of excused absences are the following:

  1. To observe a religious holy day, including travel for that purpose;
  2. To respond to a call for active military service;
  3. To participate in an official COL function (including competitions such as mock trial or negotiation competitions, and court appearances required for clinic): or
  4. Illness or other extenuating circumstances, such as death in the family requiring travel or absence.
  5. A student’s absence for pregnancy or childbirth as long as the student’s doctor deems the absences medically necessary. (For more detail on pregnancy or childbirth, see section below).

Please note that work-related travel is not the basis for an excused absence.

To obtain an excused absence, a student must complete the Excused Absence Request Form and email it to the professor. Students also will need to provide appropriate documentation of the basis for the absence. Because students ordinarily will know in advance about the need for absences in the first three categories, they should submit an excused absence form in advance of such absences. In cases of illness or extenuating circumstances, when it is not possible to submit an excused absence form in advance, students still need to complete an excused absence form and email it to the professor as soon as practical.

 

Pregnancy and Childbirth


An absence is excused when it is due to pregnancy or related conditions, including recovery from childbirth, for as long as the student’s doctor deems the absences to be medically necessary. When the student returns to school, she will be reinstated to the status she held when the leave began, which includes giving her the opportunity to make up any work missed. The College of Law may offer the student alternatives to making up missed work, such as retaking a semester, or allowing the student additional time in a program to continue at the same pace and finish at a later date, especially after longer periods of leave. The student should be allowed to choose from the alternatives presented by the professor as to how to make up the work.

The policies and practices of individual professors may not discriminate against pregnant students. For example, a professor may not refuse to allow a student to submit work after a deadline that she missed because of absences due to pregnancy or childbirth. Additionally, if the professor’s grading is based in part on class attendance or participation, the student should be allowed to earn the credits she missed so that she can be reinstated to the status she had before the leave.

 

Exception


Students may seek an exception to or waiver of the minimum attendance threshold by submitting a request in writing to the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs. The Associate Dean may allow a waiver only after consultation with the course instructor and only for compelling and unusual circumstances.

 

Assignments Submitted Late


Assignments, whether graded or not, have deadlines.  Deadlines have consequences.  Lawyers must constantly anticipate, manage, and meet deadlines.  If a lawyer misses a deadline, both the client and the lawyer may suffer serious consequences.  Professors have the discretion to set the expectations and consequences flowing from missed deadlines.

 

Submission Requirements


Many assignments at the College of Law are required to be uploaded through Canvas by a certain time.  Sometimes, students submit the “wrong” file or submit a file in the specified format.  It is important to require submission of files in the correct format.  First, the file submission requirements have a purpose; usually, the required format(s) are ones that are readable in the course management system.  Second, requiring submission of files in the correct format is consistent with the habits necessary for law practice.  Electronic filing is now the law of the courts in Texas, and courts and various agencies require electronic filings in specific formats.

Therefore, at the College of Law, each student is responsible for ascertaining that his or her files have been uploaded in the specified file format(s) by the deadline, and that the file can be opened.  Files that cannot be opened may be penalized as late unless a working copy is provided, with a screenshot evidencing that the file has not been modified since the original upload.

 

Taking Classes Outside the Enrolled Division


After completion of the required course work in the first two full academic semesters, students enrolled in the part-time division may register for “daytime” classes (that is, courses offered before 5 p.m.) after priority registration ends or if the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs approves the student’s registration in the course. Likewise, after completion of the required course work in the first two full academic semesters, students enrolled in the full-time division may register for an “evening” course after priority registration ends or if the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs approves the student’s registration in the course.

Notwithstanding this section, students must still take all lockstep required courses with their entering division.

 

Transferring Between the Day and Evening Division


When students enroll at the College of Law, they enter in either the day division or the evening division. This is the student’s “entering division.” After completion of the required course work in the first two academic semesters, students may apply to transfer from the eveing division to the day division or vice versa. In order to transfer, the student must complete the Divisional Transfer Form, with all necessary signatures, no less than two weeks prior to the end of the preceding term.

A student may transfer for three reasons:

  1. Elective: The student chooses to transfer divisions. A student may only use the Elective Transfer option once in his or her law school career.
  2. Major Life Event: A recent major life event has affected the student’s ability to continue in the student’s entering division. This must be supported by the Descriptive Statement attached to the Divisional Transfer Form.
  3. Administrative: If a student does not adhere to the requirements of the student’s division, the student may be transferred by administrative decision of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, with or without the student’s consent.

A student who transfers divisions must take all lockstep required courses in the same order as the student’s originally enrolled division, following the policy on prerequisites. The student must take each lockstep required course within one semester of when the student would have taken the course had he or she not transferred divisions. Lockstep required courses include the following courses: 

  • Lawyering Fundamentals
  • Contracts (or Contracts I & II)
  • Torts (or Torts I & II)
  • Civil Procedure I & II
  • Criminal Law
  • Property I and II
  • Legal Writing I, II, and III
  • Legal Research (or Legal Research I & II)
  • Legal Methods
  • Practice Foundations I: Interviewing and Counseling
  • Practice Foundations II: Negotiation and Conflict Management
  • Constitutional Law I and II
  • Capstone I and II

 

Disability Accommodation


The UNT Dallas College of Law (COL) provides accommodation to qualified students with disabilities in accordance with state and federal laws, including the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.

 

Eligibility


Students are eligible for accommodation and/or auxiliary aids and services if they have a documented disability and the functional limitations of the disability require such accommodation and/or auxiliary aids and services.

  1. Newly accepted and currently enrolled students are responsible for initiating a disability-related request for accommodation or auxiliary aids and services with the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs prior to the time when the accommodation or auxiliary aids or service will be needed.
  2. Prospective students may request reasonable accommodation (for testing, campus tours, or orientation) at any time during the application process by submitting an oral or written request to the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs using the Disability Accommodation Request form.

 

Requesting Disability Accommodation and/or Auxiliary Aids and Services


  1. Students must submit a request for accommodation and/or auxiliary aids and services to the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs using the Disability Accommodation Request form. In addition, students must provide relevant and complete written documentation of a disability for which accommodation is requested, including:
  2. A diagnostic statement from an appropriate professional identifying the disability, date of the current diagnostic evaluation, and the date of the original diagnosis.
  3. A description of the current functional impact of the disability.
  4. Treatments, medications, assistive devices, or services currently prescribed.
  5. The relevant credentials of the diagnosing professional(s) such as medical specialty and professional licensure.

Guidelines and forms for completing documentation are available on the College of Law website.

  1. Documentation Guidelines
  2. Disability Accommodation Request form
  3. Physical Disability Documentation form
  4. ADD/ADHD Documentation form
  5. Psychological Disability Documentation form
  6. Documentation Requirements for Other Learning Disabilities

 

Determination


A determination of whether accommodations or auxiliary aids or services are appropriate will follow after an individual assessment of a student’s written documentation and a personal meeting with the student. Among the factors to be considered in determining appropriate accommodations or auxiliary aids and services are:

  1. The nature of the student’s disability.
  2. Accommodations, auxiliary aids, or services that have worked for the student in the past.
  3. Whether the requested accommodation, auxiliary aids, or services will allow the student to effectively access and participate in the course or academic program.
  4. Whether the requested accommodation, auxiliary aids, or services will alter the essential requirements of the course or program.

The College of Law is not required to alter or modify a course or academic program to the extent that it changes the fundamental nature of that course or program. Decisions regarding accommodations or auxiliary aids and services may require consultation with College of Law faculty or administrators to consider the fundamental nature of a course or academic program.

 

Notification


The student will be notified in writing of the status of the request and the proposed date for a final determination.

 

Accommodations or Auxiliary Aids and Services Requiring Cooperation of Faculty


Certain accommodations or use of auxiliary aids and services may require cooperation from a faculty member who teaches a class in which a student is enrolled.

As early as possible in a semester, a student who has been approved for accommodation or use of auxiliary aids and services should seek a confidential meeting with the faculty member to show the faculty member the written approval of the accommodation, aids, or services, and to make arrangements for implementation of the approved accommodation, auxiliary aid, or services. 

The faculty member may not disclose the student’s disability to any other student or faculty member without the consent of the student. Faculty members may not deny an approved accommodation without consulting the Assistant Dean of Students to consider alternate means to accommodate a student’s disability.

For more detail on Disability Accommodation, see UNT Dallas Policy 7.004.

 

 

Class Ranking


Juris Doctor students are numerically ranked at the end of the fall and the spring semesters, after grades are posted. Individual ranks will only be provided to graduating students.  Ranking will not be separated by day and evening.  Ranking may be used, as necessary, for academic honors such as membership in scholarly societies, or other prizes or activities that require a certain placement within a class.

Students are placed in one of four ranking groups, based on the number of credit hours earned at the time rank is calculated. 1L Ranking Group: 0 to 30 completed hours. 2L Ranking Group: 31 to 60 completed hours. 3L Ranking Group: 61 or more completed hours. Graduate Ranking Group: completion of all program requirements.  Graduating rank will not be separated by day and evening.

Ranking of the graduating class will cover the academic year, and will include fall and summer graduates.  August graduates are ranked with students who graduated the preceding May. December graduates are ranked with students who will graduate the succeeding May.

UNT Dallas College of Law only provides individual class ranks to all JD students at graduation. However, at the conclusion of each fall and spring semester, GPA cut-offs for specified percentile rankings are posted on the law school website for the 1L, 2L, and 3L ranking groups, so that students may determine their general position within the ranking group. Specifically, GPA cutoffs are posted for the top 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25%, 33%, and 50%.

Class rank is determined by the transcripted cumulative GPA, which is rounded to the thousandths place. Individual ranks are based on the numerical sequence of students’ transcripted cumulative GPA’s, from highest to lowest. If two or more students have the same cumulative GPA, each receives the same rank. The position of those students ranked below them is unaffected. (If two students are tied for the number one rank, for example, the next student will be ranked number three, because there are two students with a higher GPA.)

Under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), the College of Law may not disclose an individual student’s location within the GPA percentile bands without the student’s written permission.

 

Classification of Students


All students are enrolled in either the day division or eveing division, and the number of hours for which a student is permitted to register is governed by the policies on Maximum Course Load and Minimum Course Load based on enrolled division. In addition to and distinct from enrollment division, for financial aid purposes, students are classified as full-time, half-time, or less than half-time.

For financial aid purposes, the following classifications apply:

  • A student is classified as a day student if he or she is enrolled in 13 or more credit hours in a fall or spring semester, or if he or she is enrolled in eight or more credit hours in a summer session.
  • A student is classified as an evening student if he or she is enrolled in 12 or fewer credit hours in a fall or spring semester, or if he or she is enrolled in four to seven credit hours in a summer session.
  • A student is classified as less than half-time and is not eligible for financial aid if he or she is enrolled in fewer than eight hours in a fall or spring semester, or if he or she is enrolled in fewer than four hours in a summer session.
  • A student is classified as a first-year student if he or she has earned 30 or fewer semester credit hours. A student is classified as a second-year student if he or she has earned between 31 and 60 credit hours.
  • A student is classified as a third-year student if he or she has earned 61 or more semester credit hours.

 

 

Course Load


 

Maximum Course Load


Day Division

A student enrolled in the day division may not register for more than sixteen credit hours in a fall or spring semester or for more than nine credit hours in a summer session without permission of the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs. In accordance with ABA Standards, all students are prohibited from registering for coursework that exceeds 20 percent of the total credit hours required for graduation.

 

Evening Division

A student enrolled in the evening division may not register for more than twelve credit hours in a fall or spring semester or for more than seven credit hours in a summer session without permission of the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs. Permission will not be granted for a student enrolled in the evening division to register for more than thirteen credit hours in a fall or spring semester or for more than eight credit hours in a summer session.

 

Correction of Excessive Course Loads

A student who enrolls for more than the permissible number of hours will be withdrawn from a course or courses until his or her registration complies with the maximum load requirements. The choice of courses from which the student will be withdrawn is in the sole discretion of the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs. If the overload is not discovered until after grades have been given for the courses, the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs may withdraw the student from a sufficient number of courses in that semester or session to bring the course load into compliance.

 

Minimum Course Load


 

Day Division

A student enrolled in the day division may not register for fewer than thirteen credit hours in a fall or spring semester, generally. A student enrolled in the day division who wishes to enroll in between eight and twelve credit hours must obtain permission of the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs or his or her designee, but does not need to file a petition for the Reduction of Minimum Hours.

 

Evening Division

A student enrolled in the evening division may not register for fewer than eight credit hours in a fall or spring semester, generally.

 

Petition for the Reduction of Minimum Hours

A student wishing to enroll in fewer than eight credit hours in a fall or spring semester must submit a Petition for the Reduction of Minimum Hours to the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs or his or her designee. A petition will only be granted if there is a showing of extenuating circumstances. A student may only submit such a petition twice during the student’s tenure at UNT Dallas College of Law.

 

 

Distance Learning


No student may be permitted to count more than 15 credit hours from distance learning courses toward the J D degree, whether through courses taken at UNT Dallas College of Law or credits transferred from another institution. No student will be permitted to enroll in a distance learning course, or receive transfer credit from a distance learning course, until the student has accumulated at least 28 credit hours toward the JD degree. No student will be permitted to enroll in more than 6 credit hours of distance learning courses in a single term.

 

Credit for Non-Law Courses Taken Through the UNT System


With advance approval, students may enroll in up to two graduate courses in the UNT Dallas Graduate School or UNT Toulouse Graduate School for up to six credits toward law school graduation. Approval will be granted only if the student, through the exercise of due diligence, cannot take a course containing substantially the same subject matter at the College of Law. Alternatively, with advance approval, students may enroll in up to two undergraduate courses at UNT Dallas or UNT for up to six credits toward law school graduation. Approval will be granted only if the courses are (a) part of foreign language sequence for which credit is granted toward an undergraduate degree; or (b) computer science courses which meet the technological competency requirement. A maximum of six hours of credit toward the JD degree will be awarded for any non-law school courses taken through the UNT System. Although grades received in non-law school courses will not be computed in a student’s grade point average, the student must earn a “B” or higher in each course to receive credit. Students on academic probation are not eligible to take non-law school courses through the UNT System. Non-law school courses taken through the UNT System will count toward the maximum number of transfer credits allowed.

 

Transfer Credit for Visits to an ABA-Approved Law School


Students enrolled in the College of Law may seek the transfer of credit taken at an ABA-approved law school. The maximum credit that the College of Law may allow to be transferred is 30 hours of Semester Credit Hours. Any student who is considering taking coursework from an ABA-approved school and who anticipates seeking to transfer credit for that coursework must first receive pre-approval of the course or courses from the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs of the College of Law. In determining whether credit may be transferred for the coursework, two decisions will be made. One is whether the course(s) will receive transfer credit. The second is whether the course(s) will receive transfer credit as an elective course, or as a required course within College of Law’s curriculum. It is possible for a course to be approved for elective credit and yet not be approved as satisfying a particular required course.

In seeking pre-approval, students should provide, to the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, a syllabus or detailed course description for each course for which they wish to receive credit. The syllabus or course description must contain sufficient information for the College of Law to determine content, grading basis, instructor, instructional minutes, method of instruction, and other details that the College of Law deems necessary to transfer credit for its program of study. The number of semester course hours that the College of Law will count for the course is generally based on the instructional minutes in the course.

Credit may be given for a course only if the student’s grade in the course meets or exceeds the minimum grade point average needed to graduate from UNT Dallas College of Law. Credit, when given, will be recorded as pass, and will not be included in the computation of the student’s College of Law grade point average. If a course for which transfer credit is sought was graded on a pass/fail basis, transfer credit may be given if that course is ordinarily taught as a pass-fail course at the school where the course was taken.

The Associate Dean for Academic Affairs will decide whether a course or courses transfer for credit, and if so whether for elective or required credit. On a regular basis, the Associate Dean shall notify the Academic standards Committee of decisions made relating to transfer credit. The Associate Dean may consult with the Academic standards Committee in relation to transfer credit decisions.

 

Credit from Study Abroad Programs


UNT Dallas College of Law students may participate in study abroad programs that are approved by the American Bar Association. Any student who is considering taking coursework from a study abroad program and who anticipates seeking to transfer credit for that coursework must first receive pre­ approval of the course or courses from the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and also be in good academic standing. In determining whether credit may be transferred for a course in a study abroad program, two decisions will be made. One is whether the course will receive transfer credit. The second is whether the course will receive transfer credit as an elective course, or as a required course within College of Law’s curriculum. It is possible for a course to be approved for elective credit and yet not be approved as satisfying a particular required course. For example, a course on the “Estate System” might be approved for elective credit, yet is not likely to be counted as satisfying the required course for Wills, Trusts and Estates at the College of Law.

In seeking pre-approval, students should provide, to the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, a syllabus or detailed course description. The syllabus or course description must contain sufficient information for the College of Law to determine content, grading basis, instructor, instructional minutes, method of instruction, and other details that the College of Law deems necessary to transfer credit for its program of study. The number of semester course hours that the College of Law will count for the course is generally based on the instructional minutes in the course.

The College of Law will accept no more than a total of 8 hours of credit from a study abroad program. Credit may be given for a course taken in a study abroad course only if the student’s grade in the course meets or exceeds the minimum grade point average needed to graduate from UNT Dallas College of Law. The grade for the course in a study abroad program will be recorded as pass/fail on the UNT Dallas College of Law transcript, and will not be counted in the calculation of the student’s grade point average at the College of Law.

The Associate Dean for Academic Affairs will decide whether a course or courses transfer for credit, and if so whether for elective or required credit. On a regular basis, the Associate Dean shall notify the Academic Standards Committee of decisions made relating to transfer credit. The Associate Dean may consult with the Academic Standards Committee in relation to transfer credit decisions.

 

Transfer Students


The College of Law admits transfer and visiting students

 

Credit Hours


The “semester credit hour” is the unit of credit at the College of Law.  All credit-bearing courses or activities at the College of Law must meet the credit hour requirements set out in this policy. 

Contact hour requirement. A traditionally delivered semester course should contain 15 weeks of instruction, plus a week for final examinations.   For instance, a three-SCH course should contain 15weeks of instruction (45 contact hours) plus a week for final examinations, so that such a course contains 45 to 48 contact hours depending on whether there is a final exam.  A course that includes fewer contact hours or is delivered in a shortened time period must receive formal, written approval in advance from the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.

Amount of work. A semester credit hour is an amount of work that reasonably approximates:

  1. Not less than one hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and two hours of out-of-class student work per week for 15 weeks, or the equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time; or
  2. At least an equivalent amount of work as required in subsection (1) for other credit-bearing academic activities as established by the College of Law, including simulation, fl81d placement, clinical, co-curricular, and other academic work leading to the award of credit hours.

For purposes of this definition, fifty minutes is sufficient to constitute one hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction, and an “hour• for out-of-class student work is sixty minutes. The College of Law may award credit hours for coursework that extends over any period of time, if the coursework entails no less than the minimum total amounts of classroom or direct faculty instruction and of-of-class student work specified in subsections (1) and (2), above.  For purposes of (1) and (2), the time may include time on final examination and midterm examinations, as well as other work.

The following are examples of work that satisfies this requirement:

  • Exam course: 42.5 hours per credit of time spent in class, preparing for class (reading or completing class assignments or assessments), and preparing for and taking exams.
  • Paper course: 42.5 hours per credit of time spent in class, preparing for class (reading or completing class assignments or assessments), and researching and writing the required paper(s).
  • Field placement or clinic: 42.5 hours per credit of time spent in class, performing fl81d placement or clinic work, preparing for class or completing class assignments (including any reflective papers), and preparing for and taking an exam, if applicable.

In order to comply with this policy, the Registrar: (1) will schedule Summer courses over an 8 week period of time in addition to the Final Exam period and all school holidays; and (2) in Fall and Spring semesters, will schedule enough course weeks such that the semester encompasses 15 of each day of the week, in addition to the exam period and all scheduled school holidays.

The College of Law will regularly monitor adherence to this policy, through methods such as ongoing curriculum review and assessment, the course approval process, and the ongoing management of the College of Law’s academic program.

 

Dean’s List and Graduation Honors


After each semester, the Registrar prepares the Dean’s List, which is based on GPA for the semester. The Dean’s List includes students who receive a 3.3 GPA or above for the semester. Graduating students receive “Latin honors” as follows:
  • 3.4            Cum laude
  • 3.7            Magna cum laude
  • 3.9            Summa cum laude

 

Examinations


Other than as stated in this policy, a student may not take a final examination or a midterm examination at a time other than the regularly scheduled time. Failure to take an examination on the regularly scheduled day, or on the day set for an exam that is rescheduled under this policy, will result in an “F” for the examination.

Rescheduling requests submitted before the start of the examination period.

A student may request to change an examination date to the next available date subsequent to the scheduled date under the following circumstances:

  1. The student has an illness that is sufficiently severe to prevent the student from taking the exam at the scheduled time.  Medical documentation is required for any application of this provision.
  2. The student experiences an unpreventable circumstance, such as severe illness or death in the immediate family that would cause the taking of the exam at the scheduled time to be a major personal hardship for the student. Medical or other appropriate documentation is required for any application of this provision. Work schedules, vacation plans, or travel arrangements do not qualify as a basis for rescheduling.
  3. The student has 3 or more examinations scheduled on the same day. If a student has 3 or more examinations on the same day, they should contact the College of Law Registrar’s Office directly to reschedule.

If a student seeks to reschedule an examination under any of these provisions, except where indicated, the student must submit his or her request to the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs by completing and submitting to an Academic Exception Request Form. The request can be submitted in hard copy or via email. If the reason for the scheduling request is conflicting exams, the request must be submitted at least two weeks before the start of the exam period. If the reason for the request is illness or hardship, the request must be submitted as soon as practicable after the student becomes aware of the problem. If the Assistant Dean of student Affairs approves the request, he will notify the Office of the Registrar, which will work with the student on available alternatives.

If the request to take an exam at other than the scheduled time presents problems relating to delivering the same exam to the student as the other students will take, the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs will consult with the instructor who, in his or her discretion, may require the student to take a special final examination or submit a special paper. If this occurs, the instructor may, in his or her discretion, grade the examination or paper either on a credit/no credit basis or on the same numerical basis as the other exams or papers.

Rescheduling requests submitted after the start of the examination period.

A student may request to change an examination date during the examination period to the scheduled date under the following circumstances:

  1. The student was ill on the examination day or on the day immediately preceding the examination, and presents medical documentation confirming the illness.
  2. The student experienced an emergency (examples would be the death or severe illness of a close relative, or a car accident) on the examination day or immediately prior to the day, and presents satisfactory evidence of the emergency.

The student must submit his or her request to the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs by completing and submitting an Academic Exception Request Form. The request should not be submitted to the professor or instructor in the course. If the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs approves the request, he will notify the Office of the Registrar, which will work with the student on available alternatives.

If the request to take an exam at other than the scheduled time presents problems relating to delivering the same exam to the student as the other students will take, the Assistant Dean of student Affairs will consult with the instructor who, in his or her discretion, may require the student to take a special final examination or submit a special paper. If this occurs, the instructor may, in his or her discretion, grade the examination or paper either on a credit/no credit basis or on the same numerical basis as the other exams or papers.

 

 

FERPA


The College of Law complies with the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) (20 USC § 1232g; 34 CFR Part 99), which protects the privacy of student education records.
 

Consent to Disclose Education Records


Except in limited circumstances, the College of Law will not release personally identifiable information from a student’s education record without a signed and dated, written consent from the student. A student’s consent to disclose an education record to a third party must specifically identify the education record for which consent is granted, the purpose for the disclosure, and the identity of the person or entity to which the education record is to be disclosed.
 

Directory Information


Directory Information· means information contained in the education record of a student that would generally not be considered harmful or an invasion of privacy if disclosed. The following types of student information are considered “directory” for the purposes of this policy:

  • Name
  • Address
  • Email address assigned by the College of Law
  • EUID assigned by the College of Law
  • Date and place of birth
  • Participation in officially recognized activities
  • Dates of attendance
  • Enrollment status
  • Degrees, awards and honors received
  • Expected graduation date
  • Most recent previous school attended
  • Photograph

Currently enrolled students wishing to withhold any or all directory information may do so by submitting a written request to the Office of the Registrar prior to the 12th class day in the fall and spring terms or equivalent dates during the summer sessions. A request to withhold directory information may be submitted after the stated deadline for a term or session, but information may be released between the deadline and receipt of the request. Directory information of a student who has requested withholding of directory information will remain excluded until the student submits a subsequent written request to release directory information.

 

Disclosure of Education Records as Permitted without a Student’s Consent


FERPA permits the disclosure of education records without a student’s consent under limited circumstances. For a full description of the circumstances under which education records may be released without student consent, please consult Policies of the UNT Dallas College of Law 7.303.
 

Student Right to Inspect and Review Records


With limited exception, a student has the right to inspect and review his or her own education records, to receive explanation and interpretation of the records, and to obtain copies of the records when needed to allow the student to effectively exercise the right of inspection and review. Students seeking to inspect or review their education records should contact the following Responsible Administrator:

 

Record

Responsible Official

Permanent

Registrar

Academic transcript

Registrar

Disciplinary record

Assistant Dean of Student Affairs

Academic disciplinary record

Assistant Dean of Student Affairs

Financial aid

Coordinator of Student Financial Aid

Financial accounts

Assistant Director of Financial Services

Placement

Assistant Dean of Career and Professional Development

 

If a student submits a request for records to an administrator other than the one who maintains the record being sought, the administrator will advise the student of the correct administrator to whom the request should be addressed.

The College of Law will comply with all student requests to review and inspect records within 45 days of the date that the request is submitted to the appropriate records custodian. Students requesting access to their education records may be asked to verify their identity with a government issued photo identification, prior to inspection. Students seeking access either electronically or by telephone will be asked to verify their identity by providing information of specific individual relevance- not including a social security number.

 

Student Right to Request Amendment of Education Records


College of Law students have the right to correct their own education records when the records are inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the student’s privacy rights. Students may request amendment of their education record by submitting a request to the appropriate records custodian. The College of Law will issue a decision within a reasonable period of time after receiving the student’s request.

Students may challenge a College of Law decision regarding the amendment of an education record by filing a request for a hearing with the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs. The request must identify the contested record and specify the reason that the record is believed to be inaccurate, misleading, or a violation of the privacy rights of the student. After the hearing, if the College of Law determines that the education record is not inaccurate, misleading, or a violation  of the student’s  privacy rights, the student may place a statement in his or her education record commenting on the contested content and the basis for disagreement with the College of Law’s decision.

The College of Law will amend any education record that is determined to be inaccurate, misleading, or a violation of the student’s privacy rights. The right to amend or correct an education record does not apply to routine grade appeals.

 

 

Graduation Requirements for Award of the J.D. Degree


To graduate with a J.D. degree from the UNT Dallas College of Law, the following requirements must be met:
  1. Credit hour requirement. Students entering in 2014, 2015 or 2016 must complete no less than 88 semester credit hours. Students entering in 2017 and beyond must complete no less than 90 hours.
  2. Residency requirement. Students must complete at least 53 hours in residence.
  3. Completion of required courses. The required courses are listed in the current Academic Catalog.
  4. Completion of the writing requirement, the skills requirement, the research requirement, the experiential requirement, and the practice-related technology requirement.
  5. Maintain satisfactory academic progress.
  6. Complete all requirements in no less than 24 months and in no more than 6 years after matriculating at the College of Law or at a law school from which the student has received transfercredit.  The ABA Standards address the pace at which a student may complete his or her legal studies. Standard 304(c) requires that the course of study for a J.D. degree be completed “no earlier than 24 months and no later than 84 months after a student has commenced law study at the law school or a law school from which the school has accepted transfer credit.” The College of Law has adopted a maximum period of 6 years (72 months). In exceptional circumstances, the College of Law may extend this requirement but to no more than the maximum allowed by ABA Standard 304(c).

 

 

Grading and Withdrawal Policies


 

Grades and GPA Computation


The grading scale at the UNT Dallas College of Law consists of the following letter grades, along with the numerical equivalent used for calculating grade point average (GPA).

 

A+

4.30

A

4.00

A-

3.70

B+ 3.30
B 3.00
B- 2.70
C+ 2.30
C 2.00
C- 1.70
D 1.00
F 0.00

 

Note: The lowest passing grade is a D.

In addition, the COL uses the following grades:

 

HP

High pass

P

Passing grade in a class graded on a pass/fail basis

W

Drop or withdrawal without penalty

I

Incomplete

Credit/No Credit

A grade of “no credit” will not be calculated within the grade point average; however, if a student receives a grade of no credit, he or she does not earn the credit for that course and, if the course is required, the student must repeat the course. The faculty may authorize a course to be graded on the basis of credit/no credit when, in the faculty’s judgment, this method of grading is appropriate given the nature and purpose of the course.

Grade point average is calculated by dividing the total number of grade points by the total number of semester hours attempted. The grade point average is rounded to the third decimal. The number of semester hours attempted includes all courses with grades from A through F.

In general, letter grades will correspond to the following levels of achievement: A=Exemplary; B=Good; C=Fair; D=Poor; F=Failure. Because the grading scale includes “plus” and “minus” for A, B, and C, the use of plus or minus corresponds to a level of achievement deemed plus or minus the level just noted.

The College of Law has several non-credit bearing requirements; specifically the Community Engagement Requirement; the Mentorship Requirement; and the Practice-Related Technology Requirement. The faculty member or members responsible for overseeing these requirements will indicate whether or not a student has completed a requirement in a given semester, in a given year, or in its entirety, as applicable. The Office of the Registrar, through its processes and degree audit, will maintain tracking of student progress towards completing these requirements. If a student has not completed work or activities for the requirement at the end of a semester in which such work or activities must be completed, a hold will be placed on the student’s registration for the next semester.

 

Incomplete


A grade of incomplete (“I”) may be granted to a student only during the last one-fourth of the session and only if the student: (1) is passing the course and (2) has a justifiable and documented reason for not completing the work on schedule that is beyond the control of the student as deemed appropriate by the instructor of record. The student has one long term to complete the work (e.g., Spring incomplete = end of fall completion; Summer incomplete = end of Fall completion date; and Fall incomplete = end of Spring completion date; or at the discretion of the instructor), unless the instructor designates an earlier deadline for completion.  The grade of “I” will revert to a grade of “F” if the work is not completed by the end of the next long term.

An extension for an incomplete to stand beyond one long term may be requested with appropriate justification, documentation, and approval of the instructor. Such an extension should be requested through the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and must also be approved by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.  Requests for extensions must be filed prior to the end of the long term in which course work is being completed and may not be made after the grade has been changed.

It is important to note that a student should not register for the incomplete course again.  The student must arrange with the instructor of record (or program coordinator if instructor is unavailable) to finish the work at a later date utilizing the Grade of Incomplete Documentation form.  This form must be filed, no later than the last day of finals for a given session/term and can be obtained from the Office of the Registrar.  The date of completion of remaining coursework should be determined in consultation with the instructor.  Upon completion of the work, the instructor will change the grade from a grade of “I” to the grade earned.

Instructors of record for a course cannot assign a grade of Incomplete without the consent of the student via the Grade of Incomplete Documentation form. Students cannot receive a grade of incomplete for a term once grades have posted officially.

 

Pass-Fail Grading


The College of Law may designate certain courses as pass-fail. Any such courses will carry a pass-fail designation at the time of registration for the semester or other term. A credit-bearing course carrying a pass-fail designation will count for purposes of required hours or other requirements, but it will not be included in the calculation of GPA.

The College of Law has several non-credit-bearing requirements; specifically, the Community Engagement Requirement; the Mentorship Requirement; and the Practice-Related Technology Requirement. The faculty member or members responsible for overseeing these requirements will indicate whether a student has completed a requirement in a given semester, in a given year, or in its entirety, as applicable. The Office of the Registrar, through its processes and degree audit, will maintain ongoing tracking of student progress towards completing these requirements. If a student has not completed work or activities for the requirement at the end of a semester in which such work or activities must be completed, a hold will be placed on the student’s registration for the next semester.

 

Grade Changes and Appeals


Under UNT Dallas policy on grade appeals, students are encouraged to “resolve grade disputes through informal discussions with their faculty members and through a formal process only when necessary: As to formal process, only final grades may be appealed. The bases for appeal of a final grade are clerical or administrative error in calculating or assigning grade; grade not calculated in accordance with the grading criteria set out in the syllabus; or grade based on arbitrary or unlawful reason, including retaliation, harassment, or observance of religious holy days. Faculty members may not consider any request to re-evaluate the work. Under the policy, when a student wishes to appeal a final grade in a course, ·the student should first arrange a formal meeting with the instructor to discuss the student’s concern.” For more detail, see UNT Dallas Policy 7.007.

 

Segment Credit


To receive credit for completing a segment, a student must receive a passing grade on the assignment that provides the segment credit, whether or not the student receives a passing grade in the course providing the segment credit. Thus, it is possible for a student to receive a passing grade in a course but not receive credit for the segment(s) provided by the class. Alternatively, it is possible for a student to receive a failing grade in a course but receive credit for the segments provided by the course on which the student received a passing grade. The criteria for a passing grade on a segment assignment will be determined by the faculty member providing the grade for the segment assignment.

 

Exemptions from Course Requirements


In general, a student must receive a D or higher on all listed prerequisites prior to enrolling in a course. If a student wishes to enroll in a course in the same semester as one or more of the listed prerequisites for that course, the student must submit the Prerequisite Exemption Form. The final determination regarding the student’s request will be made by the instructor of the course requiring the prerequisite(s) and the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs. Under no circumstances will permission be granted for a student to enroll in a course in a semester prior to the semester in which the student enrolls in the listed prerequisite(s).

 

Course Repeat Policy


RETAKING FAILED REQUIRED COURSES
A student who fails a course required for the J.D. degree must retake the course. Both the original failing grade and the new grade will count toward the student’s cumulative GPA. 

RETAKING FAILED ELECTIVE COURSES
A student who fails an elective course may retake the course, but only the original failing grade will count toward the student’s cumulative GPA. If the student passes the course, the student will be awarded the associated credit hours, but the new grade will not count toward the student’s semester or cumulative GPA.

RETAKING COURSES WITH A PASSING GRADE
A student may not retake any course in which the student has already received a passing grade.

 

Records, Registration and Enrollment Information


 

Registration Times


Registration times for each semester and session are set and published by the College of Law Registrar. A student who fails to register during the normal registration time for a semester will lose any priority in registration.

 

Adding Courses


Students may add classes during the first 4 days of the semester for fall and spring courses. For summer courses, the 3rd day of class is the last day of the period to add courses.

 

Auditing


Students currently enrolled at the UNT Dallas College of Law may audit a College of Law course if:

  1. the student has completed his or her first year (if a daystudent) or second year (if an evening student)
  2. the professor approves; and 
  3. if space is available as certified by the Registrar.

Auditing by a person other than a currently enrolled student is permissible only if the person has graduated from a J.D. program, and only if:

  1. the professor and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs grant permission, and
  2. space is available as certified by the Registrar.

The College of Law will publish the audit fee applicable for those not currently enrolled in the College of Law. Students currently enrolled in the College of Law receive priority over other law graduates as to any space available in the class to be audited.

 

Dropping and Withdrawing from Courses


No student who enters in the day division may drop required first-year courses or required third-semester courses. No student who enters in the eveing division may drop required first-year courses or required third or fourth semester courses. Other than the required courses just noted, students may drop a course before the •census date” without academic penalty or notation on the transcript. The census date is the 12th class day of a fall or spring semester, or the equivalent day of a summer session.

A student may drop a course after the census date only with approval from the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs. If a course is dropped after the census date but before the end of the first six weeks of the fall or spring semester (or the equivalent date in summer sessions), the student receives a grade of W. If a course is dropped after the end of the first six weeks of the fall or spring semester (or the equivalent date in summer sessions), the student receives a grade of W.  No student may seek to withdraw from a class after the date designated by the Registrar during the tenth week of class in the fall or spring semester (or the equivalent period in summer sessions).

The Registrar’s office will publish, for each semester of the academic year and summer sessions, the census dates and drop dates.

 

Voluntary Withdrawal


UNT Dallas Policy 7.006 covers voluntary withdrawal. Withdrawal is a formal process. If a student decides to withdraw during a semester or during a summer session, he or she must complete the formal withdrawal process in order to withdraw in academic good standing. Students considering withdrawal should consult with the Registrar to ascertain the specific steps. If a student is considering withdrawal and believes that he or she might return, the student should consider the option of a leave of absence.

 

Return after Voluntary Withdrawal

If a student withdraws in the first semester of law school and seeks to return, he or she must go through the admissions process with the applicants for admission. If a student withdraws after the first semester and seeks to return, the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs may approve the request to return. Factors bearing on whether the request will be granted include the reasons for withdrawal and the student’s level of academic success before the withdrawal.

 

Leave of Absence

Upon a proper request, a student may be allowed to take a leave of absence for reasons of finances, health, or other personal reasons. Students considering a leave of absence should consult with the Associate Dean for Academics. To receive a leave of absence, the student must complete a leave of absence request and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs must approve it. The Associate Dean will advise the student about the conditions and timing by which return might be available. When a student is on a leave of absence and is considering returning to the College of Law, the student should contact the Registrar at least three (3) months before the registration period for the term in which the student plans to return.

 

Working While Enrolled


In order to ensure that all students have the opportunity to succeed in law school, students who enroll in the full-time division and who are working more than 20 hours per week in any semester or term must first meet with the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs at the start of any semester in which the student is working more than 20 hours per week.

 

Involuntary Medical Withdrawal


The College of Law is committed to providing a learning environment that is conducive for students to develop to their fullest potential. On rare occasions, the College of Law may be required to activate a systematic response, including involuntary medical withdrawal, to students who may be in crisis or whose mental, emotional, or psychological health condition may directly threaten the safety of the learning environment.    Through the creation of a collaborative interdisciplinary team, the College of Law and UNT Dallas will provide a caring, confidential program of identification, intervention, and response in order to provide students with the greatest chance for success and the College of Law community with the greatest level of protection. See UNT Dallas Policy 7.008.

 

 

Additional Policies


 

Prohibition of Sexual Assault and Retaliation


The College of Law is committed to maintaining a work and educational environment that is free from sexual assault and retaliation.  Conduct that is inconsistent with this commitment will not be tolerated at any location, program, or other activity associated with the College of Law or UNT Dallas.  To this end, the UNT Dallas policy prohibiting sexual assault and retaliation applies to all students, faculty, staff, applicants for admission or employment, individuals and organizations conducting business on behalf of or for UNT Dallas or the College of Law, and visitors and participants at any location, program, or activity associated with the College of Law or UNT Dallas.  In addition, the College of Law may act under this policy when prohibited conduct that occurs off campus adversely affects or has a reasonable likelihood of adversely affecting the academic or work environment.

The full policy can be found at UNT Dallas Policy 5.038.

 

Student Complaints and Appeals


At the College of Law, the faculty, administration, and staff seek to provide a supportive and professional environment, with the goal of excellence in teaching and learning. The school welcomes student feedback about the educational program, services, and policies. The school also wants to ensure that students know about and have access to procedures for expressing or registering concerns, appeals, or complaints. Depending on the nature of a student’s concern or complaint, UNT Dallas or College of Law policies may provide a specific process for addressing that concern. When the concern or complaint does not fall within an existing procedure, students may use the process set out below.  The Law School will not retaliate in any manner against a student who files a complaint or appeal under any process, nor will it permit any faculty member, administrator, or student to do so.

Concerns or complaints about the College of Law that are outside the scope of any existing College of Law policy or procedure.

Many times, a concern can be resolved by speaking with the faculty member, administrator, or staff person involved. If informal resolution is unsuccessful or not feasible, the student should consult any policy that applies in the area. For instance, policies on financial aid, Code of Conduct, Honor Code, grades, and other areas contain details about appeals. At times, a student might seek deviation from, exception to, or appeal from the application of a policy on a matter.  Further, a student might have a concern or complaint relating to a matter that is not covered under a current policy.

Students should use the following process: Prepare a petition or complaint in writing; include date, student’s name, telephone number, and email address; provide as much detail as possible about the concern; and submit the complaint to the Associate Dean for Academics  (if the matter is academic) or to the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs (if the matter is non- academic). The Associate or Assistant Dean or his or her designee will investigate the complaint in a timely manner, take appropriate action, and notify the student about the proposed resolution of the matter. If the student is not satisfied with the proposed resolution, the student may appeal the decision to the Dean of the College of Law; any such appeal must be filed in writing within five business days of the notification of the proposed resolution.

 

Complaints or concerns regarding discrimination or harassment of any type (including sexual harassment made against a College of Law or UNT Dallas student  faculty member  staff member  or other member of the College of Law or wider UNTD community).

  • Please refer to UNT Dallas Policy 5.001 and 5.001a.
  • Contact: UNT Dallas College of Law Assistant Dean of Student Affairs, or, in the case of sexual harassment, Title IX Coordinator Office, UNT Dallas.
  • Report concerns or complaints relating to sexual assault or retaliation: Please refer to UNT Dallas Policy 5.038.

 

Complaints or concerns relating to requests for disability accommodation

 

Grade appeal

 

Complaints or concerns relating to the release of student information

 

Concerns or reports regarding the Code of Conduct

 

Concerns or reports relating to the Honor Code of the College of Law

 

Appeal of a decision relating to financial aid

 

Complaints relating to compliance with ABA Standards

ABA-accredited law schools are subject to the ABA standards for Approval of Law Schools. The UNT Dallas College of Law makes every effort to comply with ABA standards for addressing student complaints. A complaint is a communication in writing that seeks to bring to the attention of the law school a significant problem that directly implicates the school’s compliance with the Standards. The ABA standards may be found at: https://www.americanbar.org/groups/legal_education/resources/standards.html.

 

Bringing a complaint. A student who seeks to bring a complaint that directly implicates the school’s compliance with the Standards may do so by the following: (1) Complete and submit a written complaint form that sets forth with particularity the ABA standard or standards as to which the student has concerns about non-compliance; (2) Submit the form by email, in person, or by U.S. Mail to the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.

 

Process after submitting: The Associate Dean of Academic Affairs or his or her designee shall respond to the complainant within three (3} business days to acknowledge receipt of the complaint.  Acknowledgement may be made by email, U.S. mail, or by personal delivery. Within two weeks of acknowledging the complaint, the Associate Dean or designee shall meet with the complainant or provide a written response to the substance of the complaint. The complainant should receive a response to the complaint during the meeting or in writing, informing the complainant about the steps that are being taken by the law school to investigate or address the complaint. If additional investigation is necessary, the complainant shall receive a substantive response within two weeks after the investigation has been concluded.

 

Appeal. After the complainant receives a substantive response, setting forth what action the law school will take regarding the complainant has the right to appeal the decision to the Dean of the College of Law. The decision of the Dean is final.

 

Maintaining a Record of the Complaint: The Law School will maintain a written copy of the complaint and the resolution of the complaint for eight (8) years from the date of the final resolution of the complaint.

 

Acceptable Use of Computers and Information Resources


The College of Law provides each of its students with accounts that permit use of the College of Law’s information resources-including computer resources and software for which the College of Law has obtained licenses. By using these information resources, students agree to abide by the policies and procedures of UNT Dallas as well as federal, state, and local laws. These policies and procedures include but are not limited to the UNT Dallas acceptable use policy; UNT Dallas policies against harassment, plagiarism, and unethical conduct; and federal, state, and local laws pertaining to theft, copyright infringement, insertion of viruses into computer systems, and other computer-related crimes. Use of information resources must be consistent with UNT Dallas and College of Law policies regarding plagiarism, unethical conduct, and harassment. Laws relating to the protection of intellectual property extend to the electronic environment. Unless specifically stated otherwise, users should assume that works communicated through the computer network are subject to all federal laws, state laws, and UNT Dallas policies relating to copyright, trademark, and intellectual property.

Use of the College of Law’s information resources and content transmitted through these resources may be subject to:

  • Review or disclosure in accordance with the Texas Public Information Act and other laws;
  • Administrative review of information resource usage for a security purpose or in regard to legal or compliance concerns;
  • Information resources maintenance;
  • Audits or other reviews necessary to protect the reasonable interests of the College of Law and other uses of information resources.

Unauthorized and impermissible use of College of Law information resources includes the following:

  • Sharing College of Law accounts, personal information numbers, passwords, or other identifiers issued to the user;
  • Unauthorized entry into a file, to use, read, or change the contents or for any other purpose;
  • Abuse of computer and information resources, including interruption of function or insertion of viruses; Use of College of Law computer resources for personal financial gain or a personal commercial purpose;
  • Unauthorized copying or transferring of files or data:
  • Unauthorized use of another’s identification and/or password;
  • Use of computing facilities to interfere with the work of another student, faculty member, or College of Law official;
  • Use of computing facilities to send obscene, abusive, harassing, or threatening messages;
  • Use of computing facilities to interfere with normal operations of the College of Law computing system;
  • Damaging or altering records or programs.

For  more detail, see Chapter 14 of UNT Dallas Policies.  

 

Alcohol or Substance Abuse


The College of Law is committed to maintaining an environment free from substance abuse by students and employees as well as complying with state and federal laws related to the unlawful possession or distribution of illicit drugs and/or alcohol.

UNT Dallas policies prohibit the illicit use, sale, attempted sale, conveyance, distribution, manufacture, cultivation, dispensation, purchase, attempted purchase, and possession of illegal drugs, intoxicants, or controlled substances, at any time and in any amount or in any manner.

The purchase, consumption, and possession of alcoholic beverages in College of Law facilities shall in all respects comply with state laws and UNT Dallas policies. Failure to comply by any student will constitute grounds for disciplinary action, up to and including expulsion from the College of Law. A student who violates any state law related to use or possession of drugs or alcohol will be reported to the appropriate law enforcement agency.

Students may be required to participate in and satisfactorily complete an approved rehabilitation or assistance program. More details on the alcohol and substance abuse policy can be found in UNT Dallas Policy 7.011.

 

Compliance with Copyright Laws


Students, faculty, and staff at the UNT Dallas College of Law are expected to comply with federal copyright laws. Copyright is a form of protection provided by the laws of the United States to the authors of “original works of authorship.” A copyright belongs to the author of a work, unless the author grants the ownership in writing to someone else, such as the author’s publisher. The types of works that can be copyrighted include literary, musical, dramatic, choreographic, pictorial, graphic, sculptural, and architectural works; motion pictures and other audiovisual works; sound recordings; and electronic works, including computer chips, software, and some databases.

Lack of a copyright notice on a work does not mean the work is not protected by copyright. A copyright notice is not required under U.S. law. The use of the copyright notice is the responsibility of the copyright owner and does not require advance permission from, or registration with, the Copyright Office.

Anyone who makes unauthorized use of copyrighted material in a manner that violates the copyright owner’s exclusive rights (except for the limitations and exemptions allowed by law) is committing copyright infringement and may be subject to civil and criminal penalties as well as disciplinary action by the College of Law.

 

Free Speech


The UNT Dallas College of Law is a public institution of higher education, with its primary purpose to provide an environment for education and scholarship. College of Law facilities are reserved primarily to support the educational objectives and mission of the College of Law. The College of Law recognizes that the freedom to exchange ideas is an essential component of the educational process. Expressive activities promote debate and the sharing of ideas and substantially contribute to the marketplace of ideas that is the foundation of an educational institution. The College of Law protects the rights of students to engage in the free exchange of ideas, while promoting a safe learning environment and preventing interference with College of Law functions and activities. Expressive activity in College of Law facilities will not be limited based on content or based on the political, religious, or other affiliation of the speaker.

The College of Law facility may not be used in ways that would substantially disrupt or materially interfere with College of Law teaching, administration, or programs. Use of the College of Law facility by students or student organizations will be granted on a non-discriminatory basis, ensuring equal opportunity for all members of the College of Law community. Unless sponsored by a student organization, College of Law facilities are not available for use by individuals or groups not affiliated with the College of Law. More detail can be found in UNT Dallas Policy 7.009.

 

Identity Cards


The UNT Dallas College of Law Campus ID card (ID card) is required for access to campus classrooms, library, campus services and resources, events; in addition, it is required for student financial services assistance. The Campus ID must be in the student’s possession at all times while he or she is on the law school campus.

The Campus ID may not be used by any person other than the one to whom it is issued, and it must be surrendered on the request of any official of the College of Law. If an ID card is lost, another can be requested through the Office of Admissions during regular business hours.

 

No Tobacco Policy


No tobacco products may be consumed or used inside the UNT System Building, and the use of “e-cigarettes” is not allowed in the building.

 

Safety Warnings


All students, employees, and visitors are expected to follow directions as provided during any emergency, such as fire or severe weather. Alerts may be issued via the building’s public announcement system, email, text messages, and voice mail. Alternatively, if an alert occurs and no instructions are given, check posted instructions in all classrooms and office suites.

 

Student Email Account


UNT Dallas College of Law email serves as the official College of Law method for communicating with students. The College of Law email account will be used as a method for notifying students of dangerous or emergency situations occurring on campus, academic or financial responsibilities, and any other College of Law matters. It is the responsibility of the student to regularly check his or her UNT Dallas College of Law email.
 

Student Organizations


The College of Law recognizes the importance of student government and student organizations in the formation of students and in the mission of the College of Law.

The Student Bar Organization (SBA) acts as a representative body on behalf of students to:

  • Provide a voice for students to the College of Law administration on matters of interest to students;
  • Encourage and promote interest in university affairs and activities;
  • Promote and develop activities that enrich the social, cultural, and academic life at the College of Law; and
  • Serve on College of Law committees as designated by College of Law policy or Regent Rule.

The SBA operates in accordance with a constitution and by-laws that establish equal membership and voting rights for every student enrolled at the College of Law.

A “student organization” means a group of College of Law students joined together in the pursuit of a common purpose. Such organizations must be open to all students without regard to race, color, sex, age, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, disability, or veteran status.

Student organizations must have the formal agreement of a full-time College of Law faculty or staff member to serve as an advisor. In addition, any student organization seeking the privileges of status as a College of Law “registered student organization must register annually with the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs.

Registering organizations must provide the following upon registering with the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs:

  • A list of all current members.
  • The names and contact information for all students holding leadership positions in the student organization. If such names are not available at the time of registration, they must be provided within ten (10) business days of their election to a leadership position.
  • A copy of the student organization’s current constitution and by-laws.
  • A copy of the student organization’s policy manual, if applicable.
  • The name of the full-time faculty or staff member who has formally agreed to serve as an advisor.

Registration does not imply College of Law endorsement of the viewpoints, objectives, or purposes of the student organization, and the College of Law assumes no responsibility for the content of programs or activities sponsored by a registered student organizations.

The president or equivalent student organization leader must be currently enrolled at the College of Law and must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 2.25. If the leader’s grade point average falls below 2.25, the leader will not be eligible to continue to serve in the leadership position.

Registered organizations must participate in student organization training sessions as required by the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs. The registration process will not be complete until this requirement has been met.

Registered organizations are entitled to the following privileges:

  • Opportunity to hold meetings in College of Law facilities at no cost other than those required under other College of Law policies.
  • Eligibility for funding through the Office of the Dean of students for qualifying uses related to promotion and operation of the student organization.
  • Access to College of Law student organization web resources and email at no cost, so long as the student organization acts in compliance with College of Law computer use policies.
  • Opportunity to schedule and present programs for the College of Law community through the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs .
  • Recognition in the annual publications of the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs.

Student organizations are subject to the requirements of the College of Law Code of Conduct, and violations of the Code may result in the withdrawal of privileges under the provisions of the Code.

More details on student government and student organizations can be found in UNT Dallas Policy 7.012.

 

Student Journals - The UNT Dallas Law Review


The UNT Dallas Law Review publishes two digital law journals: On the Cusp and Accessible Law. The content of both journals is available only online and is hosted by the UNT Digital Library.

On the Cusp publishes online articles of high value to practicing lawyers, especially on legal topics of interest to small and solo practitioners. On the Cusp includes articles written by external authors (practitioners, professors, and judges), as well as student-written articles.

Accessible Law is a multimedia journal that is published online.  Accessible Law is focused on producing content that explains laws and the legal system for the community at large. Accessible Law features four primary types of content: articles, columns, multimedia presentations, and forms.

To reflect the College of Law’s commitment to the important mission of both journals, and to draw on the faculty’s diverse practice and writing experience, The UNT Dallas Law Review is advised by a Faculty Advisory Board.

 

Timely Warnings


In accordance with the Jeane Clery Act, UNT Dallas will issue warnings to the university community, including the College of Law, of crimes that may present a serious or continuing threat to the university or college community in a manner that is timely and that will aid in the prevention of similar crimes. The timely warning will be issued using a combination of methods that allow for the prompt communication to the university community. Timely warnings will include sufficient information about the nature of the threat to allow members of the community to take protective action, unless law enforcement determines that publishing such information could possibly compromise law enforcement actions. For more detail, see UNT Dallas Policy 12.001.

 

Use of Rooms


When not in use for classes or college events, rooms may be reserved for group study or student meetings by completing the appropriate form available from the Registrar’s Office.

 

Honor Code Policy Statement


 

POLICY STATEMENT
In its preamble to the Model Rules of Professional Responsibility, the American Bar Association states: “A lawyer, as a member of the legal profession, is a representative of clients, an officer of the legal system, and a public citizen having special responsibility for the quality of justice.” A legal education is the gateway to serving these roles as a lawyer, and a student’s legal education is itself a critical period in his or her professional formation. Thus, all students at the UNT Dallas College of Law are expected to abide by the high ethical and conduct standards needed to serve as representatives of clients, officers of the legal system, and public citizens with special responsibility for the quality of justice. In addition, Honor Code violations may adversely impact a student’s application for admission to the Bar of Texas and other states, because the Board of Law Examiners investigates the character and fitness of applicants to the Bar.

These expectations are expressed in and put into operation through two avenues: the Honor Code, and the Code of Conduct. The Honor Code expresses the expectation that students will behave with academic integrity. The requirement of academic integrity means that a student  will not cheat, plagiarize, or falsify in any academic matter. The Code of Conduct expresses the expectation that all members of the UNT Dallas College of Law community will conduct themselves in a manner that demonstrates civility as well as respect for the dignity, rights, safety, and property of others.

Because students, faculty, and administration have a vital interest in maintaining a community of academic integrity, all play a role in the administration and ongoing development of the Honor Code.
 

  1. APPLICATION OF POLICY
    The Honor Code applies to all students at the UNT Dallas College of Law and to all academic matters.  Students are expected to maintain the principles of academic integrity and to conform to the requirements of this Honor Code upon application for admission to the College of Law through the award of their degree or such time as there is a formal termination of the student relationship with the College of Law. Violations of the Honor Code will continue to be considered even if a student withdraws from the College of Law or graduates from the College of Law during the review process.
     
  2. DEFINITIONS
    1. Academic Matters. Any actions or activity related to a course or to satisfying the requirements for graduation, and any curricular and co-curricular activities connected to students’ academic and professional development including but not limited to moot court competitions, journals, externships and career services.
    2. College of Law (“COL”). The UNT Dallas College of Law.
    3. Honor Council. The entity trained to review alleged violations of the Honor Code and also to promote awareness of the Honor Code.
  3. UNT DALLAS COLLEGE OF LAW HONOR COUNCIL
    1. The COL Honor Council is entrusted by the COL Community to administer the COL Honor Code and to promote awareness of and education about the Honor Code. The COL Honor Council regularly reviews the Honor Code and may adopt bylaws and publish guidelines and information that are consistent with and further the effectiveness of the Honor Code.
    2. The nine (9) member Honor Council includes the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, who will serve as chair of the Council, four (4) COL faculty members who will be appointed by the Dean of the College of Law, and four (4) students who will be appointed in the initial year of Honor Council operation by the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs but in all subsequent years will be selected and appointed by the officers of the COL Student Bar Association based on student applications and in accordance with procedures adopted by the COL Student Bar Association.
    3. Honor Council members will be appointed for a single academic term (August 1 through July 31), with faculty members permitted to serve consecutive appointments upon appointment by the Dean, and with and students permitted to serve consecutive appointments in accordance with procedures adopted by the COL Student Bar Association.
    4. Upon appointment, all members of the Honor Council must agree to abide by an oath of confidentiality modeled after the oath taken by members of the State Bar of Texas Attorney Grievance Committee, which states:
      1. “I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute my duties as a member of the Honor Council of the UNT Dallas College of Law. I further solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will keep confidential all matters that come to my knowledge as a member of the Honor Council arising from or in connection with any Honor Code matter, unless permitted to disclose a matter in accordance with the Honor Code or unless ordered to do so.”
  4. CATEGORIES OF ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT
    All students of the UNT Dallas College of Law shall behave with academic integrity. Cheating, plagiarizing, or falsifying in any academic matter is a violation of this standard and constitutes academic misconduct.

    The requirement of academic integrity has implications for the UNT Dallas College of Law community as well as for individual students.  Academic misconduct undermines the common bond of trust, fairness, and ethical behavior within the College of Law community. Thus, all members of the College of Law community are under an obligation to report academic misconduct.

    To a large extent, there is common understanding about what constitutes academic misconduct. Adults usually do not need a definition of cheating, plagiarizing, or falsifying to know whether they are engaging in that conduct. Yet some definitions, examples, and guidelines are useful to include in this Honor Code. First, these can have a signaling and reinforcing effect. Second, these can educate students in areas as to which there may be less common understanding, such as the relationship between paraphrasing and plagiarism. Third, it is important to describe violations of this Code in sufficient detail to prevent misunderstanding about the scope and effects of this Code.

    ​The COL Honor Code is not written with the specificity of a criminal statute, nor is it intended to cover every instance of potentially prohibited academic misconduct.  Students may be disciplined for the following types of academic misconduct.
    1. Cheating: An act of deception or misrepresentation by which a student could gain an unfair advantage in an academic matters. Examples include:
      1. Obtaining information about a test or assignment other than by the methods or within the boundaries that the instructor has permitted.
      2. Seeking to make research resources unavailable to other students, such as hiding or destroying books or sources.
      3. Seeking or receiving any unauthorized assistance, or providing any unauthorized assistance to another, in connection with tests or assignments.
      4. Submitting work for credit on one course that the student has already submitted for credit in another course, unless authorized by the instructor.
      5. Taking additional time beyond the time authorized to complete an assignment or exam.
      6. Collaborating in an unauthorized way. At the College of Law, a student’s work in curricular and co-curricular settings is often expected and in some cases required to be collaborative.  However, in other instances, a student will be required to work individually, without collaboration or assistance.  Unauthorized collaboration is collaboration that does not comply with the instructor’s requirements relating to receiving assistance for or collaborating with others.
    2. Plagiarism: Presenting as one’s own work any material obtained from another source, whatever the source - for instance text, Internet, digital materials, or materials prepared by other students. Intent is not required to constitute plagiarism; negligent plagiarism is a violation of the Honor Code. In general, obtaining and using materials from any source without proper attribution constitutes plagiarism. Whether plagiarism has occurred does not depend on the quantity of the material that is used. Plagiarism includes but is not limited to the following conduct:
      1. Verbatim copying another’s work without proper attribution (quotation marks and citation to sources).
      2. Slightly paraphrasing otherwise verbatim material, even if the source is cited, without indicating that the passage is basically taken verbatim from the source.
      3. Using another’s ideas or concepts without proper attribution.
      4. Mixing verbatim or slightly paraphrased content from multiple sources without proper attribution of the underlying source.
    3. Falsifying: Lying, fabricating facts or sources, or misrepresenting facts or sources; including but not limited to:
      1. Using a false excuse to avoid or be excused from an assignment or test.
      2. Falsely indicating the time at which an assignment is turned in.
      3. Falsifying the hours spent on an assignment or project when the number of hours spent is relevant to credit or grade awarded.
      4. Falsely indicating the presence of the student or another student for attendance in connection with any academic matter.
      5. Signing another student’s name or allowing one’s own name to be signed by another student in connection with any academic matter.
      6. Forging or altering student records or documents.
      7. Citing nonexistent authority or authority known not to support the proposition for which it is used.
      8. Aiding or abetting an act of academic misconduct. Assisting or aiding another to cheat, plagiarize or falsify, or participating in any effort to cover-up or hide a violation of the Honor Code.
  5. COMMUNITY OBLIGATION TO REPORT VIOLATIONS
    The COL is committed to maintaining a culture of professionalism and mutual respect. All members of the COL should expect and insist on academic integrity from themselves and all members of the community. Failure to exercise academic integrity undermines the common bond of trust, fairness, and ethical behavior within the COL community. If any student observes conduct that he or she believes violates this Honor Code, the student has an obligation to speak to the faculty member or to the Honor Code Representative. All members of the COL community must also report violations of academic integrity committed by others.
     
  6. SANCTIONS FOR ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT
    1. The Honor Code does not require a particular sanction for a particular violation of the Honor Code. Rather, the full range of sanctions set out below is available for an Honor Code violation. Which sanction or sanctions are proper in a given case depends on circumstances including:
      1. Flagrancy of the violation. Negligence or inadvertence is not, per se, a defense to an Honor Code violation, although negligent or inadvertent conduct sometimes will not constitute an Honor Code violation. The fact that conduct was negligent rather than intentional may mitigate a sanction; likewise, the fact that a student acted intentionally may be an aggravating factor.
      2. Harm to others.
      3. Self-reporting of a violation before knowing that anyone else would report the violation.
      4. Any other circumstances that, in the judgment of the Honor Code Hearing Panel, should be treated as aggravating or mitigating factors.
    2. Possible sanctions for violation of the Honor Code include:
      1. Written Reprimand.
      2. Educational Sanction.
        1. For Honor Code violations relating to a class or course credit, and with the concurrence of the instructor, an educational sanction may include:                             
          1. Change of course grade, including change to a failing grade.
          2. Disallowing credit for an academic assignment or test, with or without an opportunity to resubmit or re-take an assignment or test.
          3. Removing academic credit for a course.
        2. Failure to comply with the assignment may result in further discipline.
      3. Loss of Privileges. Includes removal from student organizations or denial of privilege to participate in COL activities.
      4. Probation. For a specified period of time and/or under specified conditions.
      5. Suspension. For a specified period of time or until compliance with specified conditions is documented.
      6. Expulsion.  Permanent separation from the COL.
  7. PROCEDURES TO ADDRESS HONOR CODE VIOLATIONS
    1. Honor Code Representative. The Dean of the College of Law will designate a senior administrator or faculty member to serve as the Honor Code Representative (HCR). The HCR will conduct a preliminary investigation of reported Honor Code violations. The HCR will also maintain records of all reported violations of the Honor Code and will provide an annual summary of violations and sanctions.
    2. Reporting Honor Code Violations. Any member of the COL Community (faculty, student, staff or administrator) who has reasonable cause to believe that an Honor Code violation has occurred must report the violation to the HCR. Members of the COL faculty may also follow the procedures set forth in Section VIII.C. A written report to the HCR must include:
      1. The name of the reporting person.
      2. The date, time and location of the reported violation.
      3. A complete description of the alleged violation.
      4. Names of any potential witnesses or individuals with information related to the reported violation.
    3. Faculty Review of Possible Honor Code Violations. If a faculty member believes that a student in his or her class has violated the Honor Code, the faculty member may either meet with the student to discuss the alleged violation or report the violation directly to the HCR without meeting with the student.
      1. After meeting with the student:
        1. If there is reasonable cause to believe that an Honor Code violation has occurred, the faculty member must report the alleged violation to the HCR.  The report to the HCR is not a final conclusion that an Honor Code violation has occurred. The faculty report to the HCR must include:
          1. The name of the reporting faculty member.
          2. The date, time and location of the reported violation.
          3. A complete description of the alleged violation.
          4. Names of any potential witnesses or individuals with information related to the reported violation.
        2. If there is not reasonable cause to believe that an Honor Code violation has occurred, no further action will be taken by the faculty member.
      2. A direct faculty referral for HCR review must be submitted to the Office of the Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs and copied to the student.  The referral must include:
        1. A full description of the alleged violation of the Honor Code.
        2. A full summary of all information to be provided in response to the alleged violation, including information presented by the student to the HCR during the initial meeting if available.
    4. Preliminary Investigation of Honor Code violations by HCR. The HCR will investigate written reports of violations of the Honor Code to determine whether there is reasonable cause to believe that a violation of the Honor Code occurred. The HCR will notify the student who is the subject of a reported violation and require the student to respond within seven (7) calendar days of the date of the notice to schedule a meeting to review the allegations and to offer a response.

      ​If a student fails to respond timely, the HCR will refer the reported violation for immediate review by the Honor Council.
      1.  At a meeting with the student, the HCR will review the reported violation and any information developed through the HCR’s preliminary investigation.  The student will be offered the opportunity to respond and to offer additional information for consideration by the HCR.
      2. After the HCR concludes the preliminary investigation, if there is not sufficient information to provide reasonable cause to believe that a violation of the Honor Code occurred, the HCR will dismiss the reported violation.
      3. If the HCR finds reasonable cause to believe that a violation of the Honor Code has occurred, the HCR will meet with the student to discuss options available to the student to address the Honor Code violation, including:
        1. Entering an Agreed Disposition; or,
        2. Requesting referral to the Honor Council for final determination.
      4. A student must contact the HCR no more than (7) calendar days after the meeting to select an option to address the Honor Code violation. If the student fails to contact the HCR within seven (7) calendar days, the HCR will refer the reported violation to the Honor Council for final determination. The written referral to the HCR will include a full description of the alleged violation and a full summary of all information to be provided in response to the alleged violation, including information presented by the student to the HCR during the initial meeting if available.
    5. Agreed Disposition of Honor Code Violations.
      1. A student may resolve an Honor Code violation through an agreed disposition at any time during the Honor Code review process. An Agreed Disposition must be in writing and must include:
        1. An admission that the reported conduct constitutes a violation of the Honor Code.
        2. Waiver of the option for the Honor Council to consider the circumstances underlying the alleged violation of the Honor Code or to reach a final conclusion.
        3. Acknowledgement that the agreed disposition constitutes a finding that the student has violated the COL Honor Code and that the finding must be reported upon request on an application to sit for any bar exam.
      2. Records of an agreed disposition will be maintained permanently by the Dean of Students in accordance with the COL Student Records Policy, with nonconsensual disclosure limited as set forth in the policy.
    6. Review of Honor Code violations by the Honor Council. The Honor Council will review alleged violations of the Honor Code that are: directly referred by faculty; requested by a student after meeting with the HCR; or referred by the HCR due to lack of the student’s participation or cooperation in the review process.
      1. Upon receiving notice of a request for Honor Council review, the Chair of the Honor Council will appoint a five (5) member Honor Code Hearing Panel from among the members of the Honor Council.  No member of the Honor Council may be appointed to serve on a Hearing Panel for a matter on which the Honor Council member has a conflict of interest.  In addition to the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or his or her designee, the Honor Code Hearing Panel must include:
        1. Two (2) students. If student members of the Honor Council are not available to serve on a panel within a reasonable period of time, the Dean of the College of Law may appoint substitute student members to the Hearing Panel in consultation with the President of the Student Bar Association.
        2. Two (2) members of the faculty. If faculty members of the Honor Council are not available to serve on a panel within a reasonable period of time, the Dean of the College of Law may appoint substitute faculty members.
      2. The Honor Council Hearing Panel is appointed on an as needed basis to:
        1. Collect and review information, and make final determinations related to alleged violations of the Honor Code.
        2. Determine appropriate sanctions based on violations of the Honor Code.
      3. The Honor Council Hearing Panel will select a chair from among the appointed faculty members or the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs (or his or her designee) to preside over the hearing and make all decisions related to procedure.
      4. As soon as practicable after receipt of the request for review, the Hearing Panel will notify the student, the faculty member, and HCR as appropriate about the date, time and place for the requested hearing.
    7. Agreed disposition once a Hearing Panel is Convened. Once a Hearing Panel has been convened, upon request of a student, the chair will convene a conference to include the student (and his or her representative), the HCR, and one student and one faculty member of the Hearing Panel to consider the possibility of an agreed disposition. An agreed disposition is subject to the requirements set forth in Section VIII.E., and any agreed disposition must be approved by the chair.
       
    8. Hearing Panel Procedures
      1. Standard of Proof. Evidence of a violation of the Honor Code must be proven through clear and convincing evidence.
      2. Record of Hearings. All Panel Hearings will be recorded electronically and the record will be maintained in the Office of the Dean of Students. The record will be made available to the student upon request and a copy will be provided on request at the cost of the student.
      3. Student Representation. Students are expected to represent themselves before the Hearing Panel. Students may be accompanied by counsel or another representative during the hearing; however the advisor or counsel may not participate in the hearing and may advise the student only during breaks. A student must notify the chair seven (7) days prior to a hearing if the student will be accompanied by counsel, so that an attorney from the University of North Texas System Office of General Counsel may also be present at the hearing.
      4. Notice of Witnesses and Exhibits. No fewer than five (5) days before the hearing begins, the HCR and student must submit the names of witnesses and documents to be presented at the hearing to the chair of the Hearing Panel and to each other. Information received by the HCR or student after all other information is exchanged may still be introduced during the hearing upon providing reasonable notice to the other party.
      5. Close hearing. Hearings are closed and the proceedings are confidential. Hearing Panel members and others participating in the hearing may not discuss the proceedings prior to final resolution.
      6. Oath. The chair of the hearing Panel will require all witnesses to take an oath to tell the truth.
      7. Opening and closing statements. Both the HCR and the student may offer opening and closing statements with the HCR going first and last in the order of presentation.
      8. Presentation of evidence.
        1. The HCR will present evidence and call witnesses followed by the student’s presentation of evidence and witnesses. The HCR and student may ask questions of any witnesses. The chair and Hearing Panel members may also ask questions of any witnesses including the HCR and the student.
        2. A student may elect not to present evidence or witnesses or to speak on the student’s own behalf.  The decision not to present evidence will not be construed as an admission of responsibility.
        3. Proceedings before the Hearing Panel are not bound by the formal rules of evidence. The chair will make determinations regarding the relevancy of evidence and may limit evidence that is redundant, prejudicial or irrelevant.
    9. Decision of the Hearing Panel. A decision of the Hearing Panel must be supported by at least four (4) of the five (5) members of the Hearing Panel. The Hearing Panel will issue a written decision at the conclusion of the hearing setting out its findings of fact related to the violation of the Honor Code, its determination related to the alleged violation of the Honor Code, and the appropriate sanction if a violation of the Honor Code is confirmed. Notice of the Hearing Panel’s decision will be provided to the student and the HCR within five (5) days.  A decision of the Hearing Panel is final unless a student appeals the decision within fourteen (14) days.
       
    10. Appeal of the Hearing Panel Decision.
      1. A student may appeal the decision of the Hearing Panel to the Dean of the College of Law on the limited grounds that the decision was:
        1. based on a clearly erroneous interpretation of the Honor Code;
        2. arbitrary and capricious; or
        3. grossly excessive in regard to the assigned sanction.
      2.  A student seeking appeal to the Dean must file a written notice of appeal with the Dean within fourteen (14) days of the decision of the Hearing Panel. The notice of appeal must describe the basis for the appeal and any supporting facts or analysis in support of the appeal.  A copy of the notice of appeal must also be provided to the HCR, who may also provide additional summary in support of the decision of the Hearing Panel.
      3. Upon review of the complete record and submissions by the student and the HCR, the Dean or a designee of the Dean may:
        1. affirm the Hearing Panel decision and provide notice to the student.
        2. recommend a different sanction, however the recommended sanction may not be more harsh than the sanction recommended by the Hearing Panel.
        3. remand the matter back to the Hearing Panel for further proceedings or collection of evidence as defined by the Dean, in which case the subsequent decision of the Hearing Panel will be subject to appeal in accordance with the normal process for review.
      4. The decision of the Dean or his or her designee is final.
  8. Student Records. Any agreed disposition or final determination by the Hearing Panel of the Dean of the College of Law will be maintained in the student’s permanent academic file in accordance with the COL Student Records Policy.
     
  9. Notices All notices provided in accordance with these procedures will be delivered confidentially to a student’s official secure COL email address. All procedural dates will be calculated based on the date when a notice is sent to the student’s official COL email address.

 

Student’s Rights, Responsibilities and Conduct


Policy Statement:

 

The University of North Texas at Dallas, as a student-centered public University, has established standards of conduct to foster an educational environment conducive to learning and development. Students and University student organizations are expected to conduct themselves in a manner that demonstrates respect for the rights and property of others and upholds the integrity of the University community. The

standards of conduct outlined in the Code of Student’s Rights and Responsibilities and Conduct have been developed to ensure the well-being, honor and dignity of all who live, learn and work in our educational community.

 

Application of Policy:

 

This policy applies to all individuals who apply for admission to, enroll in and matriculate or graduate from the University of North Texas at Dallas (UNT Dallas), student organizations, and to conduct that occurs on the premises of UNT Dallas, at any location, program or other activity sponsored by or associated with UNT Dallas sponsored activities. The policy also applies when conduct that occurs off-campus adversely affects or has a reasonable likelihood of adversely affecting the educational environment or UNT Dallas community and the pursuit of its objectives

 

Definitions

 

  1. Code of Student Rights and Responsibilities (“the Code”) - The official university policy that sets out the rights and responsibilities of UNT Dallas students and student organizations, as defined by this policy, the manner in which students and student organizations are expected to conduct themselves at all times, and the procedures established to fairly address conduct that departs from these expectations.
  2. Complainant - Complainant means an individual who may have been the subject of conduct prohibited under the policy regardless of whether the individual reports the conduct.
  3. Conduct Record - Documentation of a student’s conduct violation(s) and sanction(s) while at UNT-Dallas.
  4. Conduct Process - The procedures provided in the Code from the initial notice of complaint through final resolution to consider whether a student has engaged in misconduct, and whether conduct sanctions should be imposed.
  5. Conduct Sanction - An official action assigned by the University for a violation of the Code.
  6. Consent -Words or actions that show an active, knowing and voluntary agreement to engage in sexual activity. Consent cannot be gained by force, coercion, manipulation, threats, or by taking advantage of the incapacitation of another when the individual knows or reasonably should know of such incapacity by use of alcohol or drugs. Consent is absent when the activity in question exceeds the scope of previously given consent, or the person is unconscious or otherwise unaware that the prohibited conduct is occurring. Consent may be revoked at any time.
  7. Day - Day means calendar days unless otherwise stated in the policy.
  8. Dating Violence - Abuse or violence, or threat of abuse or violence, against a person with whom the actor has or has had a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature.
  9. Dean of Students (DOS) - The University official responsible for administering the student disciplinary conduct process in accordance with the Code, for maintaining student disciplinary conduct records, and for assisting students in resolving conflicts with one another.
  10. Domestic Violence - A physical act perpetrated against a person’s will by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the complainant.
  11. Good Conduct Standing - Status in which a student is fully eligible to participate in University activities and privileges.
  12. Initial Meeting - An opportunity for a student to review alleged misconduct and provide an opportunity for the student to respond.
  13. No-Contact Order - Administrative directive issued by a UNTDSA Representative prohibiting contact between individuals. The directive may be given as an interim measure during an investigation or as a sanction.
  14. Notice of Complaint - The initial document in the conduct process that identifies alleged misconduct in violation of the Code, and schedules a meeting between the student and a UNTDSA Representative to discuss possible violations of the Code and sanctions.
  15. Notice of Disciplinary Sanctions - A document in the disciplinary process that identifies conduct sanctions based on a violation of the Code.
  16. Permanent Student Conduct Record - Documentation of a student’s conduct violation(s) and sanction(s) that are permanently maintained by UNTDSA subject to the University records retention schedule. This record is separate from an academic record.
  17. Preponderance of the Evidence - Preponderance of the evidence means the amount information necessary to establish whether an allegation is more likely than not to have occurred (i.e. more likely true than not true). Preponderance of the evidence also is referred to as the greater weight of the evidence.
  18. Respondent - Respondent means an individual or organization identified as possibly having engaged in conduct prohibited under the policy regardless of whether a formal complaint is made.
  19. Sexual Assault- “Sexual Assault” means the intentional or knowing penetration, no matter how slight, of the sex organ or anus with any body part or object, or oral sex, without consent of the complainant. The term sexual assault also is referred to as rape.
  20. Sexual Coercion - The use of manipulation or threat to force someone to have sex.
  21. Sexual Exploitation - Taking non-consensual or abusive sexual advantage of another for another’s own advantage or benefit, or to benefit or advantage anyone other than the person being exploited, including, but not limited to, non-consensual video or audio-taping of sexual activity or undetected viewing of another’s sexual activity.
  22. Sexual Harassment - “Sexual harassment” means unwelcome verbal, nonverbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature (including gender-based and sex-stereotyping conduct of a sexual nature) that:
    1. in the employment context unreasonably interferes with the person’s work performance or creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work environment; or
    2. in the education context is sufficiently severe, persistent or pervasive that the conduct interferes with a student’s ability to participate in or benefit from the university’s educational programs or activities. For purposes of this policy, conduct is sufficiently severe, persistent or pervasive in the education context if its frequency, or threatening or humiliating nature unreasonably interferes with or limits the student’s ability to participate in or benefit from the university’s educational program or activity, including when the conduct reasonably creates an intimidating, hostile, abusive or offensive educational environment.

Examples of unwelcomed conduct that may constitute sexual harassment under this policy (regardless of the medium or platform) include but are not limited to:

  • repeated requests for dates, sexual flirtations or propositions of a sexual nature;
  • subtle pressure for a sexual relationship;
  • sexist remarks about a person’s clothing, body or sexual activities;
  • unnecessary touching, hugging or brushing against a person’s body;
  • direct or implied threats that submission to sexual advances will affect or be a condition of employment, work status, grades, or letter of recommendation;
  • comments of a sexual nature that cause humiliation, such as use of inappropriate terms of address;
  • sexual assault; and
  • sexually explicit or sexist comments, questions or jokes.​
  1. Sexual Misconduct - Conduct including sexual harassment, sexual exploitation, sexual assault, domestic violence, stalking, and sexual violence.
  2. Sexual Violence - A physical sexual act perpetrated against a person’s will, or when a person is so incapacitated that he or she is incapable of giving consent due to the use of drugs or alcohol, or where a person is incapable of giving consent due to an intellectual or other disability (including sexual assault). Sexual violence is a form of sexual harassment.
  3. Stalking- A course of conduct directed at a person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for the person’s safety or to suffer substantial emotional distress.
  4. Student - Student means an individual who has applied for admission or readmission to the University of North Texas at Dallas, who is registered or enrolled in one or more courses for credit at the University, or who currently is not enrolled but has continuing academic relationship with the University.
  5. Student Conduct Committee (“the Committee”) - A group convened at the request of a student or student organization for the purpose of providing an opportunity for impartial evaluation of alleged violations of misconduct and sanctions.
  6. Title IX Coordinator - Title IX Coordinator means a University of North Texas at Dallas employee designated by the President to implement, monitor, and enforce the University’s Title IX program. In this policy, reference to the Title IX Coordinator also means their designees.
  7. University - The University of North Texas at Dallas
  8. University Community - The collective group of students, faculty, staff, and any other person employed by or contributing to the University.
  9. University Premises - All land, buildings, and portion of buildings owned or leased by the University or a component of the UNT System.
  10. University Privilege - A benefit that is granted by the University or enjoyed by students, including but not limited to, participating in social events or University sponsored activities, election to student leadership positions, and membership in student organization(s).
  11. UNTDSA Representative - A University official authorized by the President to investigate alleged violations of the Code and to administer the procedures and sanctions as set forth in the Code.
  12. University Sponsored Activity - All functions, events, and programs on the University premises or conducted under the authority of the University.
  13. University Student Group/Student Organization (“Student Group” or “Student Organization”) - A group of students who share a common interest and who are registered as a recognized student group in accordance with student organization policies.

 

Procedures and Responsibilities:

 

Interim Removal

A student who presents a substantial and imminent threat to the health, safety, or welfare of the University community or its property may be temporarily removed from campus premises and prohibited from participating in all University sponsored activities pending a determination of the threat. A student temporarily removed under this provision must meet with a member of the C.A.R.E. team within two days or as soon as reasonably possible to determine whether the student may return to campus and participate in activities pending conclusion of the student conduct process. A student will be informed in writing whether the interim removal will remain in effect.

   Amnesty Policy

Any student who in good faith reports being the victim of or witness to sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence and stalking, will not be subject to disciplinary action for a violation of the code of conduct that occurred at or near the time of the incident, unless the student is found responsible for the offense.

Student Rights and Responsibilities (Section 1):
I. Student Rights

The University is an academic community in which all persons share responsibility for its quality and wellbeing. As members of the University community, students can reasonably expect all the guarantees and protections afforded students of public institutions, including:

  1. The right to fair and equitable process in all matters concerning the Code.
  2. The right to exercise their privileges and responsibilities as student.
  3. The right to be free from discrimination on the basis of race, ethnicity, gender, age, religion, creed, national origin, disability, veteran status, sexual orientation, or gender identity.
  4. The right to engage in inquiry and discussion, to exchange thought and opinion, and to speak, write, and print freely on any subject in accordance with the guarantees of federal and state laws.
  5. The right to engage in peaceful and orderly speech, protest, demonstration, and picketing within the public forum to the extent such activities do not disrupt the academic and administrative functions of the University. The University reserves the right, in accordance with federal and state law, to approve the time, place and manner of such activities.
  6. The right to participate in the formulation of policy directly affecting students when allowed by law.
  7. The right to participate in student organizations within the University.
  8. The right to ready access to established University policies and procedures.

 

Responsible Party: Office of Community Standards

 

II.  Student Rights in the Conduct Process

When a student is charged with an alleged violation of the Code that student has the right to:

  1. Receive notice of the alleged violation(s), know who to contact for a meeting, and the date by which that contact must occur.
  2. Present information in response to the allegations of misconduct, including an oral and written statement, witnesses, documents, and any other information that reasonably responds to the allegations.
  3. Be accompanied by an advisor. Advisors may not speak or participate directly in the conduct process.
  4. Choose to not participate or answer questions in a meeting.
  5. Ask questions of any statements or witnesses presented.
  6. Review by impartial officials and students participating in the conduct process.
  7. Appeal the findings, suspension, and expulsion as allowed by the Code.
  1. Student Responsibilities

1.Witnesses of Student Conduct Violations

Members of the UNT Dallas community are strongly encouraged to participate in any conduct proceedings and to appear as witnesses when reasonably notified.

2.  Guests of University Students

Guests must adhere to all University rules, and the hosting student is responsible for all guests’ actions. It is the responsibility of the host to inform the guests of these rules.  The host can be held financially responsible for the actions of a guest, as well as face Code charges for any guests’ behavior. In the University’s sole and absolute discretion, guests may be prohibited from entering University premises.

3.  Responsible Action Protocol:

At UNT Dallas, the health, safety and welfare of our students and community are paramount concerns. As such, all UNT Dallas students are expected to alert appropriate officials in the event of any health or safety emergency -specifically including those involving the abuse of alcohol or drugs.

Because the University understands that fear of possible disciplinary actions may act as a barrier to students seeking requests for emergency assistance, the University has adopted the following Responsible Action Protocol to alleviate such concerns and promote responsible action on the part of students. In a situation involving imminent threat or danger to the health or safety of any individual(s), students are expected:

  1. to contact emergency officials by calling 911 to report the incident
  2. to remain with the individual(s) needing emergency treatment and cooperate with emergency officials, so long as it is safe to do so, and
  3. to meet with appropriate University officials after the incident and cooperate with any University investigation.

 

The University will consider the positive impact of taking responsible action in an emergency situation when determining the appropriate response for alleged conduct violations by the reporting student that may have occurred prior to or contemporaneously with the emergency situation. In some situations, this may mean that no University disciplinary action is taken or no disciplinary sanctions are imposed, but the incident will be documented, and educational, community, and health initiatives -as well as contact with a student’s parent(s) or guardian(s) -may be required.

The protocol does not preclude or prevent action by police or other local authorities. Nor does this protocol preclude disciplinary action regarding other violations of the Code, such as causing or threatening physical harm, sexual misconduct, property damage, harassment, hazing, etc. Failure of students to take responsible actions in an emergency situation, however, may void all protections under this provision, may constitute an aggravating factor for purposes of sanctioning, and may lead to further disciplinary actions when such failure to act otherwise constitutes a violation of University rules, regulations, or policies

4.  Student Organization Responsibility

A student organization will be responsible for the actions and conduct of its members, when one or more of its members, acting in the capacity of their membership, commit a violation of the Code. Group misconduct need not be officially approved by the entire membership in order to be considered grounds for possible conduct action towards the organization. There is no minimum number of organization members who must be involved in an incident before conduct action may be taken towards the entire organization.

 

Any Notice of Complaint regarding alleged misconduct involving a student group will be delivered to the President as outlined in this policy. A Notice of Complaint will be sent to the attention of the president or other leader of the student organization with a copy to the on campus advisor and other advisors as appropriate along with the appropriate Student Affairs Staff member. Student organizations are responsible for responding to all Notices of Complaint and failure to respond may result in resolution of the matter in the absence of any representative of the student group.

Responsible Party: Office of Community Standards

5.  Categories of Misconduct:

  1. Trespassing, forcefully entering and/or occupying University-owned, leased, or controlled premises without authorization.
  2. Destroying or vandalizing personal and/or public property; unauthorized, mischievous and/or inappropriate use of such property.
  3. Unauthorized use or abuse of a computer system, access code[s], keys, or similar device to access controlled data, UNT Dallas’s property, or a restricted area of any of the University’s campuses.
  4.   Theft or unauthorized use of property or services of the University, its members, or its visitors.
  5. Providing false information to a University official who is performing their official duties or engaging in other similar forms of dishonesty, including making a wrongful accusation against any member of the University community.
  6. Failing to comply with reasonable directive of University officials (i.e. faculty, staff, graduate assistants, resident assistants, student employees) or law enforcement officers who have identified themselves as such and are performing their duties; and/or failing to identify oneself to such persons when requested to do so.
  7. Falsifying or withholding required information in any form from a University official, including information on an application for admission.
  8. Committing academic misconduct:
    1. Using the words or ideas of another, from the Internet or any source, without proper citation of the source(s), commonly called plagiarism.
    2. Receiving unauthorized external assistance during an examination or any academic exercise for credit. This includes, but is not limited to:
      1. Providing or receiving aid in connection with any academic assignment;
      2. Use or possession of camera telephones, text messages, computer disks, audio recorders, calculators, solution materials, photocopies, materials from previous classes, commercial research services, notes or other means to copy or photograph materials used or intended for academic evaluation for use during the academic evaluation or assignment;
      3. Communication in any manner with another student;
      4. Working with others on graded coursework, including in-class, on- line and take-home examinations; or
      5. Possessing, reading, buying, selling or using any materials intended for an academic evaluation or assignment in advance of its administration.
    3. Turning in the same work in more than one class (or when repeating a class), unless permission is received in advance from the instructor.
    4. Falsifying information for inclusion in an assigned paper, project or exercise; including inventing or altering data from a laboratory or field project, or creating fictional citations for a paper.
    5. Attempting to influence or change any academic evaluation, assignment or academic records for reasons having no relevance to academic achievement. This includes, but is not limited to, bribery, threats and making unauthorized changes to any academic record.
    6. Falsifying or misrepresenting attendance, hours, or activities in relationship to any class, internship, externship, field experience, clinical activity or similar activity.
    7. Acting or attempting to act as a substitute for another, or using or attempting to use a substitute, in any academic evaluation or assignment.
    8. Facilitating, permitting or tolerating any of the above-listed items.
  9. Disrupting classroom activity, University functions, and/or the operations of the University by an action or combination of actions that unreasonably interfere with, hinder, obstruct, or prevent the right of others to freely participate in an activity, program, or service of the University.
  10. Violating any institutional safety regulation, including, but not limited to:
    1. Falsely reporting a fire, bomb, or any other emergency by any means, including activation of an alarm;
    2. Engaging in the unauthorized possession, use, or alteration or tampering of any University-owned emergency or safety equipment;
    3. Failing to evacuate a building or other structure during an emergency or an emergency drill; and
    4. Taking any action that creates a substantial risk that potentially compromises the safety of an individual or the community.
  11. Operating a vehicle, including a motorized cart, in any manner that endangers any person or property.
  12. Possessing, storing, controlling, or using a functioning or nonfunctioning firearm, firework, explosive, incendiary device, or other weapon or device classified as a weapon by the State of Texas or utilizing any instrument to simulate a weapon in a manner that endangers or tends to endanger, threaten, or intimidate any person. Individuals who are licensed to carry a handgun must be in compliance with UNT Dallas Policy No. 12.0006 Carrying of  Concealed  Handguns  on  Campus. For more information please visit https://police.untdallas.edu/sites/default/files/12.006_carrying_of_concealed_handguns_on_campus.pdf.  NOTE: “Firearm” is defined as any gun, rifle, pistol, or handgun designed to fire bullets, BBs, pellets, or shots - including paintballs -regardless of the propellant used. “Other weapon” is defined as any instrument of combat or any object not designed as an instrument of combat but carried for the purpose of inflicting or threatening bodily injury. Examples include, but are not limited to: knives with fixed blades or pocketknives with blades longer than four inches, metal knuckles, hatchets, nunchakus, or any explosive or incendiary device.
  13. Using, selling, possessing, distributing, or being under the influence of an alcoholic beverage, except as permitted by law and University policy. Members of the University community are accountable for their decisions regarding their use of alcohol, as well as their behavior which occurs as a result of those decisions.
  14. Using, possessing, distributing, selling, or being under the influence of an illegal drug or narcotic; manufacturing, growing, or synthesizing an illegal drug or narcotic; possessing drug paraphernalia; or setting up or possessing laboratory equipment or materials for the purpose of making or distributing an illegal drug or narcotic.
  15. Threatening, assaulting, or causing physical harm to oneself or to another. Uttering any words or performing any acts that cause physical injury, or threaten any individual, or interfere with any individual’s rightful actions, including but not limited to the following:
    1. words or actions that would cause an individual to fear for his or her immediate safety.
    2. the use of physical force against an individual.
    3. repeatedly contacting another person when the contact is unwanted.
  16. Hazing (as defined in the Texas Education Code), including engaging in, soliciting, encouraging, direction, aiding or intentionally, knowingly or recklessly permitting behavior such as physical brutality, risk of harm to mental or physical health or safety, intimidation, threat or ostracism, mental stress, humiliation, or other behaviors adverse to health or human dignity in association with pledging, initiation, affiliation with, holding office in, or maintain membership in a student group; or having firsthand knowledge of the planning of hazing or of its occurrence and failing to report it to school authorities
  17. Harassment, which is any verbal, visual, electronic, or physical conduct that is sufficiently severe, and ongoing that it adversely affects, or has the purpose or logical consequence of interfering with any student’s educational program; or creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive environment within the University community. Harassment can include, but is not limited to, the above behaviors towards any person because of race, ethnicity, religion, gender, sexual orientation, gender idenity, age, creed, national origin, disability, veteran status, or on any other basis.
  18. Sexually harassing any person, by making one or more unwelcome sex-related comments or sexual overtures, engaging in other similar physical behaviors, or displaying offensive visual materials which interfere with, or are intended to interfere with another person’s work or study. Even one incident, if it is sufficiently serious, may constitute sexual harassment.
  19. Engaging in sexual misconduct, including any physical act which is sexual in nature that is committed under pressure, force, threat, intimidation, or without the full and informed consent of all persons involved. For the purposes of this policy, consent must be freely and actively given through mutually understandable terms or actions. A person is deemed incapable of giving consent when that person is a minor, mentally disabled, mentally incapacitated, physically helpless, under the influence of drugs or alcohol to the point of being unable to make a rational decision, unconscious, or asleep. A person always has the right to revoke consent at any time during a sexual act.
  20. Abusing the Code of Student’s Rights and Responsibilities and Conduct, including but not limited to:
    1. Knowingly filing a false, inaccurate, or misleading statement or accusation against another person;
    2. Knowingly providing false, inaccurate, or misleading information to a conduct officer or body;
    3. Disrupting or interfering with the orderly business of a conduct proceeding;
    4. Discouraging, or attempting to discourage, an individual’s participation in, or access to the student conduct process;
    5. Influencing, or attempting to influence, the impartiality of any conduct officer or member of a conduct body prior to, during, and/or after a conduct proceeding;
    6. Intimidating or harassing, or attempting to intimidate or harass, any participant of a conduct process prior to, during, and/or after a conduct proceeding;
    7. Failing to comply with sanctions imposed under the Code;
    8. Violating the terms of a conduct sanction; and
    9. Influencing, or attempting to influence, another person to commit an abuse of the Code of Student’s Rights and Responsibilities and Conduct.
  21. Misusing, falsely representing, defacing, mutilating, or stealing a University document.
  22. Assisting in or inciting others into violating any provision of the Code.
  23. Attempting to violate any provision of the Code.
  24. Possessing or manufacturing any false or altered form of identification, improperly using any identification card, knowingly altering or mutilating a UNT Dallas student identification card, using the identification card of another, or allowing use of one’s own card by another.
  25. Littering and/or inappropriate disposal of refuse, including ejecting any objects from vehicles or from windows in residence halls, balconies, or other University buildings.
  26. Being present during any violation of the Code in such a way as to condone, support, or encourage such violation. Students who anticipate or observe a violation of University policy are expected to remove themselves from participation and are encouraged to report the violation.
  27. Retaliation against an individual who reports allegations of harassment or any other code violation and provides information in an investigation related to such complaint. 
  28. Any act or conduct that obstructs or hinders the application and enforcement of the Code.
  29. Any violation of the UNT Dallas College of Law Honor Code.
  30. Any act or actions that is contrary to federal, state, or local law, or University policy.

6.  Student Records:

Student records will be maintained in accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (“FERPA”) of 1974 and the U.S. Department of Education’s guidelines for implementation. Academic and conduct records will be maintained separately.

Transcripts of academic records will contain information concerning academic status, including disqualification for academic reasons, expulsion, suspension and revocation of admission for conduct reasons. With the exception of records relating to expulsion, suspension and revocation of admission, all conduct records will be destroyed seven (7) years after the date of the incident. Records relating to expulsion, suspension and revocation of admission will be held permanently.

 

Responsible Party: Office of Community Standards

 

Student Conduct Process and Procedure Section 2:

 

I.  Filing a Complaint

Complaints alleging a violation of the Student Code will be filed with the Office of Community Standards. Such complaints must meet the following criteria:

  1. The complaint must be submitted in writing or electronically and dated;
  2. The complaint must clearly indicate the name of the respondent. If necessary, follow-up documentation may be requested before a complaint is acted upon;
  3. To the extent possible; the date, time, place, name of person(s) involved, and the circumstances of the alleged violation should be specified; and
  4. The name(s) of any person(s) who may have witnessed the alleged prohibited conduct should be listed.
  5. The complaint must be filed no later than thirty (30) days after discovery of the incident which is the topic of the complaint. The Office of Community Standards may waive the thirty-day limitation upon demonstration of good cause.
  6. All cases involving possible violations of Title IX will be referred to the Title IX Coordinator and will follow the policies and procedures for investigating a Title IX Case.

 

Responsible Party: Office of Community Standards

 

II.  Notification and Information Gathering
  1. Reports of alleged violations of the Code will be reviewed by the Office of Community Standards for possible administrative action. When necessary the Office of Community Standards may appoint a designee to review the incident and assess the information provided.
  2. The Office of Community Standards will notify the student(s) named in the report of the alleged violation(s), who they need to contact for a meeting, and the date by which they call to set up the appointment. The notice of complaint or call in letter, will be sent to the student’s official University issued UNT Dallas email account, which will serve as official notice. In the event that the primary notice is not successful, and at the Office of Community Standard’s discretion, a secondary notice may also be sent via US Mail to the student’s official address on file with the University, or by hand delivery.
  3. All communications sent by the Office of Community Standards are considered received when sent, provided:
    1. If sent by electronic mail: One (1) day has elapsed from the time the official electronic mail is sent.
    2. If by U.S. Mail: Three (3) days have elapsed from the time notice was sent off- campus by U.S. Mail.
  1. The notice of complaint will describe the alleged violation and advise the student that an administrative transcript and a registration hold may be placed on the student’s academic records pending investigation and resolution of the report. The notice will include the Office of Community Standards website address where the Code is posted, as well as electronic addresses where any other relevant University policies and/or procedures are posted.
  2. The Office of Community Standards will gather information relevant to any report indicating that a Code violation may have occurred. The Office of Community Standards or its responsible designee for gathering that information has the authority to contact and meet with any person(s) believed to have information relevant to the report and encourage them to discuss the allegations in the report. In the absence of compelling circumstances, the information gathering process will be completed within sixty (60) days after the receipt of the complaint.
  3. During the information gathering process, a “No Contact Order” may be issued by the Office of Community Standards if it is determined by the Office of Community Standards to be in the best interest of the investigation or protection of individuals involved.  A “No Contact Order” prohibits a student from initiating or contributing to any verbal, physical, written, or electronic contact with a specifically identified individual(s), and such individual’s immediate families or physical possessions.A “No Contact Order” may also prohibit a student from entering specific University-owned or controlled properties. Failure to comply with a “No Contact Order” may result in further conduct proceedings and may result in an emergency removal from the University.
  4. Based on the information gathered, the Office of Community Standards will decide whether to: 1) dismiss the code violation 2) find the student not responsible, or 3) make a recommendation to the DOS or their designee for conduct action.
  5. The Office of Community Standards may dismiss the code violation or find the student not responsible at any stage if it finds that the report is baseless or otherwise unsupported by preponderance of the evidence, or that the underlying grievance or problem is better resolved in a different manner. If the complaint is dismissed or student is found not responsible, the Office of Community Standards will notify the student either verbally at the agreed resolution meeting, or in accordance with the conditions set forth in this policy about communication from the Office of Community Standards.
  6. If the charges assigned to the report are to be forwarded for conduct action, the Office of Community Standards will notify the respondent, the complainant, and any witnesses in the manner and conditions set forth in this policy; and will clearly outline the appropriate procedures to be followed.
  7. If the proposed action against the student may lead, in the opinion of the Office of Community Standards, to suspension or expulsion and the respondent is under the age of eighteen (18) years, the parents or legal guardians of the respondent may be notified of the charges and of the pending meeting at least ten (10) days in advance. The notice of Complaint will be sent by certified or registered mail, return receipt requested, to the parent’s or legal guardian’s last known address.

 

Responsible Party: Office of Community Standards

 

III.Agreed Resolution Meeting

In all cases, respondents have the right to a Student Conduct Committee meeting. A respondent, however, may request in writing that the Office of Community Standards resolve the report without proceeding to a Conduct Committee meeting.

 

  1. The Office of Community Standards may resolve the report with the consent of the respondent by:
    1. Reaching consensus with the complainant and the respondent as mediated by the Office of Community Standards.
    2. Permitting the complainant to voluntarily drop the complaint; or
    3. Permitting the student charged to voluntarily accept conduct sanctions.
  1. In all Agreed Resolution meetings, the Office of Community Standards will conduct a resolution discussion at which the respondent may have an advisor present. The respondent has the right to be assisted by an advisor of their choice, at their own expense. The respondent is responsible for presenting their own information, and therefore, advisors are not permitted to speak or to participate directly in any agreed resolution meeting.
    1. All information-gathering will be completed before the conclusion of the agreed resolution meeting process.
    2. After the information gathering and agreed resolution meeting, the Office of Community Standards will provide the respondent with a letter containing a complete accounting of the proposed sanctions and violations within five (5) of the date of the agreed resolution meeting at which the sanctions were outlined. If the sanctions contained in the written report differ from what was presented at the agreed resolution meeting, the Office of Community Standards must note and explain those differences.
    3. In addition, the letter will inform the respondent that they or it may accept or reject the sanctions. If the respondent rejects the sanctions in whole or in part, the agreed resolution meeting process ends and a Student Conduct Committee meeting will be scheduled.
    4. The agreed resolution meeting process is final and is not appealable.
    5. The respondent has the responsibility to notify the Office of Community Standards in writing of the student’s choice to accept or reject the sanctions within five (5) days of the date the respondent received the notice of the

proposed sanctions. If the respondent rejects the proposed sanctions, the Office of Community Standards will notify the respondent that the agreed resolution meeting process has ended and the Student Conduct Committee process will begin.

  1. The respondent has the right to request a Student Conduct Committee meeting at any time during the agreed resolution meeting process. This Student Conduct Committee meeting may be based on responsibility or, when responsibility is already accepted, strictly on acceptance of sanctions.

 

Responsible Party: Office of Community Standards

IV.Student Conduct Committee Meeting
  1. Process: Student Conduct Committee Meeting procedures will be followed:

 

  1. The DOS or their designee may determine that the matter should not proceed to a Student Conduct Committee Meeting. Unless new information sufficient in the opinion of the DOS or their designee to reopen the case is discovered, the conduct procedures will be closed.
  2. Within five (5) days of the completion of the initial information gathering process, or the agreed resolution meeting process, the Office of Community Standards will make a determination on whether to proceed to a Student Conduct Committee Meeting.
  3. Once the Office of Community Standards determines that the matter should proceed to a Student Conduct Committee Meeting, any additional investigation by the Office of Community Standards must be concluded within five (5) days, absent compelling circumstances.
  4. Within five (5) days after the decision of the Office of Community Standards to conduct a committee meeting, the Office of Community Standards will identify which meeting type the student will receive. This decision will be made by the student. If the student does not choose after five (5) days it will be at the discretion of the Office of Community Standards to decide which of the following type of meeting will be held:
    1. Individual Committee Member Meeting: An Individual Committee meeting will be held individually with a Committee Member who is appointed by the DOS or their designee. The Committee Members role is to be an impartial and objective party, aware of and knowledgeable about the Code and committee meeting procedures.
    2. Committee Meeting: A committee meeting, administered by the Office of Community Standards, with members drawn from a pool of faculty, staff, and students who have completed the approved conduct committee training. The Student Conduct Committee will be composed of a chair and at least three (3) additional members, one of whom is a student. The chair will serve without a vote and direct the committee meeting. In the event of an unplanned absence, a representative from the Office of Community Standards may serve as the non- voting Chair of a Committee Meeting.
  5. A student may petition the DOS or their designee to request, or the DOS or their designee may choose, to hold a meeting before a Special Committee member or a Special Conduct Committee. The decision rests with the DOS or their designee.
    1. Special Individual Committee Member Meeting: An Individual Committee Member Meeting held before a Committee member, appointed by the DOS or their designee, who has the professional experience in presiding a conduct proceedings and who holds no contractual relationship with UNT Dallas or any other UNT institution during the term of the appointment as a Special Committee member
    2. Special Committee Meeting: A Student Conduct Committee, administered by a Committee member, appointed by the DOS or their designee and an elected Student Conduct Committee. The composition of the committee will be consistent with the Student Conduct Committee Meeting
  6. The student may challenge any representative or committee member(s) for cause, and may challenge a decision by the DOS or their designee to appoint a Special Committee Member or Special Committee Meeting.
  1. Notice: Notice for all Student Conduct Committee Meeting options will follow this process:

 

  1. The Office of Community Standards will give a notice of the Student Conduct Committee Meeting to the student at least ten (10) days prior to any committee meeting. That notice of the Student Conduct Committee Meeting will include the following information:
    1. Date, time, and place of the meeting;
    2. Specific violations of the Code that the student is charged with;
    3. Name of the complaintant or University department submitting complaint;
    4. Specification, to the extent possible, of the time, place, person(s) involved, circumstances of alleged prohibited conduct, and name(s) of possible witness(es);.
    5. Notification that an advisor selected by the student may accompany the student to the committee meeting. The advisor will not be permitted to present information on the student’s behalf;
    6. A statement of the applicable type of Committee Meeting; and
    7. Such other information as the Office of Community Standards may wish to include that is relevant to the case.
  2. Notices will be delivered to the respondents in the manner and according to the timelines set forth in this policy in regards to communication
  3. If the student intends to have an advisor or other representative present, they must notify the Office of Community Standards at least five (5) days in advance of the Committee Meeting and specify the name and address of the advisor, and whether the advisor is an attorney in writing. If, at any time during the process, the student desires to obtain a representative or change their representative, the student may invoke such right. Under such circumstances, the proceeding may be stayed for a period of no fewer than five (5) and no more than fifteen (15) days as determined by the Office of Community Standards. The student may invoke the right to obtain or change their representative only once in any conduct process, unless the Office of Community Standards agrees to any additional requests for such changes.
  4. During the Student Conduct Committee Meeting the Office of Community Standards is responsible for providing a written summary and verbal presentation of the charges, including all relevant information that resulted from the investigation process, to the committee members and the student. This role is assumed by the Office of Community Standards in all Committee Meetings, whether the complainant is present or not. The summary of charges and supporting information will provide the basis of the Student Conduct Committee Meeting proceedings.
  5. Upon request, the respondent, the advisor, and the Office of Community Standards have the right to examine any supporting documentation to be presented at the meeting, at least five (5) days prior to the meeting during regular business hours. Thus, all documentation for the meeting file must be submitted by the complainant, respondent, witnesses, and the Office of Community Standards by this deadline.
  6. All Student Conduct Committee Meetings are closed unless the student requests an open meeting. The DOS or their designee must approve the opening of said meeting.
  7. All Student Conduct Committee Meetings conducted by a Committee, or Special Committee require a majority vote of the committee to find a student responsible for violating the Code.
  8. All determinations by a Student Conduct Committee will be made on the basis of whether it is more likely than not (preponderance of the evidence) that the student violated the Code.
  9. During the Student Conduct Committee Meeting the complainant and respondent are responsible for presenting their own information, and therefore, advisors are not permitted to speak or to participate directly in any committee meeting.
  10. The complainant, the respondent, and Community Standards representative, Committee member, are the only individuals in a Student Conduct Committee Meeting who have the right to present information and question witnesses.
  11. The student has the right to appear at a Student Conduct Committee Meeting to hear the evidence, offer explanatory and clarifying information and evidence, and question any witnesses. The student may choose not to attend the Student Conduct Committee Meeting. If the student, with notice, does not appear for a Student Conduct Committee Meeting, the information in support of the charges will still be presented and considered. In such cases, failure to respond or appear will not create a presumption of either responsibility or non-responsibility.
  12. All findings of fact, recommendations, and decisions must be based solely on the information made available for use at the Student Conduct Committee Meeting. This includes, but is not limited to, all information made available to the student as part of the Student Conduct Committee Meeting file.
  13. A single Student Conduct Committee Meeting may be held for more than one person charged in cases arising out of a single or multiple occurrences. The Office of Community Standards makes such determinations, subject to review by the DOS or    their designee. Each student, however, retains the right to request that his/her or its case be heard individually.
  14. A recording will be made of the meeting for the purpose of review by a Student Conduct Committee Appeal Meeting. The recording will be the property of UNT Dallas and will be maintained as such for a period of two (2) calendar years after the meeting. However, it will be maintained for a longer period if the matter is subject to a litigation hold and/or pending in a court of law. Upon the written request of the student, a copy of the recording will be made available to the student by the Office of Community Standard, within fifteen (15) days of the request.
  15. Findings of fact and recommended sanction(s), if any, will be made in writing by the Community Standards representative, or Student Conduct /Committee/Committee Chair to the DOS or their designee within five (5) days after the close of the meeting.
  16. The DOS or their designee will review the findings of fact and recommended sanctions reported by the Community Standards representative or Student Conduct/Committee/Committee Chair, and may:
  1. Dismiss the charge or charges, in any combination;
  2. Affirm the recommended sanctions;
  3. Impose a greater or lesser sanction than recommended; or
  4. Order a new meeting.
  1. The DOS or their designee will submit a written decision within five (5) days after receipt of the findings and recommended sanctions. Concurrently, the DOS or their designee will provide notice and copies of the decision to the student and to the Office of Community Standards. The notice will also contain a notice of appeal rights and procedures and will be in accordance with delivery methods and conditions set forth in this policy. An additional five (5) days will be added in cases of suspension or expulsion. When a student under the age of eighteen years is suspended or expelled, the student’s parent(s) or legal guardian(s) will be notified by certified mail, return receipt requested, sent to last known address on file with the University.
  2. If the student does not appeal the decision of the DOS or their designee such decision will be final

 

Responsible Party: Office of Community Standards

V.  Appeal Rights
  1. A student found responsible for a violation of the Code has the right to appeal that decision imposed to the DOS or their designee. A request for appeal must be filed within five (5) days from the student’s receipt of findings.
  2. The right of appeal is the right to seek review of a Student Conduct Committee Meeting decision or other action by the DOS; it is not a right to a new meeting.
  3. To prepare the appeal request, the student and the advisor have the right to review the student’s conduct file, including any recording of the meeting.
  4. Any sanction imposed as a result of a committee meeting will not become effective during the five (5) days during which an appeal may be filed, or until any such appeal has been decided, except that the DOS or their designee has the authority, in their absolute discretion that extenuating circumstances exist, to immediately impose the sanction.

 

Responsible Party: Office of Community Standards

 

VI.Appeal Procedures
  1. Appeal to the DOS: A student may appeal a decision from the Office of Community Standards on at least one (1) of the following:
    1. The conduct procedures were not followed.
    2. New information that was not present at the time of the meeting has been made available.
    3. Imposition of a sanction of suspension or expulsion
  1. Procedures for appeals from committee meeting decisions:
    1. All appeals will be submitted in writing within five day of receipt of the decision from the Office of Community Standards.
    2. The appeal must identify the procedures that were not followed or any new information that was not present at the time of the decision by the Office of Community Standard. In cases of suspension or expulsion, the appeal must include the reason(s) the student believes the sanction is not supported by the information considered by the Office of Community Standards or the students conduct. The appeals also must include any information the student wants the DOS to consider.
    3. The student may request a meeting with the DOS to discuss the appeal.
  2. Student Appeal Record: In considering the appeal, the DOS will consider all information used in determining the findings and sanctions including the notice of complaint, recommendation of the committee meeting, written decision of the Office of Community Standards, and the letter of appeal.
  3. Appeal Result: The DOS may find the student not responsible, modify the decision of the Office of Community Standards including greater or lesser sanctions, or affirm the decision of the Office of Community Standards. The decision of the DOS is final except for findings resulting in the sanction of expulsion.
  4. The DOS will send copies of the appeal decision, within five days (5) to the student charged The Office of Community Standards.
  5. Appeal to the Vice President of Student Access and Success: A student whose sanction of expulsion is upheld by the DOS may appeal to the Vice President of Student Access and Success.
    1. The appeal must be submitted in writing within five (5) days of receipt of the decision from the DOS and state why expulsion is not supported by the record.
    2. The Vice President of Student Access and Success will consider all information used in determining the findings and sanctions and inform the student of the result in writing. The decision usual will be made within 5 days.
    3. The decision of the Vice President of Student Access and Success is final.

 

Responsible Party: Office of Community Standards

 

VII.Sanctions

Depending upon the severity of the violation, and whether a repeat or multiple violations are involved, sanctions may be imposed by the Hearing Coordinator, Committee, Office of Community Standards, the DOS or their designee, or the Vice President of Student Access and Success in any order or combination.

 

In addition to the disciplinary, educational, community, and health initiative sanctions identified below, and in the University’s sole discretion, a student may be required to perform specific restitution service, to complete counseling or other specialized treatment or support services, and/or be required to participate in an activity or program whose purpose is to redirect behavior.

 

Any violation of the Code that is motivated by race, ethnicity, religion, gender, sexual orientation, age, creed, national origin, disability, or veteran status may subject the student to the imposition of a sanction more severe than would be imposed in the absence of such motivation.

 

A sanction may have an accompanying administrative fee, in which case the student will be notified at the time the sanction is assigned. Payment of an administrative fee will be considered part of the successful completion of the sanction.

 

Failure to comply with any such sanction or requirements will constitute an additional violation of the Code, and may result in additional and increased sanctions in accordance with the procedures set forth in this Code.

 

Sanctions:

 

  1. Warning: Notice, oral or written, that continued or repeated violations of UNT Dallas policies may be cause for further conduct action. These actions would normally be in the form of censure, loss of privileges, exclusion from activities, probation, suspension, or expulsion.
  2. Restrictions, Loss of Privileges and Exclusion from Activities: Exclusion or restriction from participation in privileges, extracurricular activities, holding office, or represent the University. Removal from a University-living environment, loss of use privileges for designated University facilities, denial of the use of a vehicle on campus, and other restrictions consistent with the violation committed.
  3. Restitution Payment or Services: The requirement to provide restoration or restitution for a loss due to violations including, but not limited to: defacement, damage, fraud, theft, and misappropriation of property. Restitution may be imposed either exclusively or in combination with other sanctions. Restitution may take the form of monetary payment or appropriate services to repair or otherwise compensate for damages.
  4. Conduct Probation: The terms of probation will be determined at the time the probation is imposed. Probation may include exclusion from participation in privileges or extracurricular activities. The student placed on probation shall be notified in writing that the commission of prohibited acts will lead to additional and/or increased conduct sanctions.
  5. Disciplinary Conduct Suspension: This is the temporary separation of the student from the University for a specified period of time and until specific conditions, if imposed, have been met. A disciplinary suspended student shall not participate in any University- sponsored activity and shall be barred from all University campuses and properties. The student will be notified in writing of the suspension. The official transcript of the student shall be marked “Conduct Suspension Effective (date) to (date).” The parent(s) or legal guardian(s) of students under the age of eighteen (18) years shall be notified of the action. After the suspension period has elapsed, the student will be placed on conduct probation for a period of time that is equal to the amount of time that the student was suspended. At the end of the probationary period, the student will be classified as being in “good standing” provided that no further Code violations have occurred.
  6. Expulsion or Termination: Permanent separation of the student from the University. The expelled student shall not participate in any University-sponsored activity and shall be barred from all UNT campuses and properties. The official transcript of the student shall be marked “Conduct Expulsion Effective (date).” The parent(s) or legal guardian(s) of a student under the age of eighteen (18) years shall be notified of the action.
  7. Parent or Guardian Notification of Drugs and Alcohol Related Violations: UNT-Dallas may notify the parent(s) or legal guardian(s) of any student under 21 years of age who is found responsible for violating the Alcohol and/or Controlled Substance policy.
  8. Required Educational or Restitution Activities: Mandatory participation in educational activities or programs of community restitution service on campus or in the community, as approved.
  9. Administrative Conduct Hold: A status documented in the Registrar’s official file that precludes the student from registering for classes and accessing official transcripts until clearance from the Office of Community Standards or the DOS or their designee.
  10. Proof of Payment or Resolution of UNT-Dallas Citations: A student may need to provide proof that a citation for parking and/or other issues have been resolved.
  11. Intake, Assessment, or Treatment Referrals: A student may be referred to UNT-Dallas Counseling & Wellness Office or a community mental health provider to complete an intake and assessment involving alcohol, controlled substance, or other identified issues arising from a violation. In the University’s discretion, proof of participation or completion of treatment may be required. When appropriate, a student may be referred to an off-campus provider for such services at the student’s expense.
  12. Reflection Letter of Understanding: A student will reflect on what has been learned from the experience. The length and structure of such letter will be specifically assigned to the student by the Office of Community Standards.
  13. Alcohol or Controlled Substance Education Responses: A student will complete an alcohol and controlled substance program/workshop, or attend an identified off-campus education or intervention resource.
  14. Academic Misconduct: Potential sanctions for academic misconduct include, but are not limited to, the following, either singularly or in any combination:
    1. Academic Sanctions
      1. Resubmitting an assignment
      2. Reduction of points or letter grade for the assignment
      3. Dropping a class
      4. Reduction of points or letter grade for class
      5. Failing grade for assignment
      6. Failing grade for class
    2. Conduct Sanctions
      1. Reflection Letter of Understanding
      2. Skill Remediation
      3. Academic Integrity Seminar
      4. Conduct Warning or Probation
      5. Loss of Privileges
      6. Transcript notation
      7. Suspension or removal from program, school, or college
      8. Suspension from the University
      9. Expulsion
      10. Withdrawal of credit for previously accepted course or requirement
      11. Revocation of a degree or certificate
      12. Referral to the appropriate legal authority
  1. Additional Sanctions: Any other sanctions assigned by the Office of Community Standards that is meant to be educational in nature.

 

Responsible Party: Office of Community Standards

Interpretation and Revision
  1. Interpretation - Questions of interpretation or application of the Code will be referred to the DOS, or their designee, for final determination following consultation with the Office of General Counsel.
  2. Revision-The Code will be reviewed every three (3) years under the direction of the Office of Community Standards Associate Provost for Student Success.

 

 

Academic Program


 

J.D. Program Overview


The UNT Dallas College of Law offers the Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree through a full-lime day program and a part-lime evening program. Both programs require completion of no less than 88 credit hours for students beginning study in 2014, 2015, and 2016 and 90 credit hours for students beginning study in 2017 and beyond, including first-year required courses; other required courses; completion of the writing requirement, the research requirement, the skills requirement, the experiential requirement, and the practice- ready technology requirement.

 

Design of the J.D. Curriculum


The curriculum at the UNT Dallas College of Law reflects three overall aims:

  • Ensuring that all students graduate with practice-ready competencies; that is, the knowledge, understanding, and skills essential to the practice of law;
  • Providing students with the opportunity to explore a range of interest areas through electives and experiences; and
  • Providing students with the opportunity to develop deeper and specialized knowledge, skills, and understandings in areas that interest them.

The components of the J.D. curriculum fall within three general categories:

  • Required Courses. Some required courses are taken in a specific semester; other required courses may be taken during any of several semesters.
  • Requirements that do not require the taking of specific classes but that are satisfied by a specific type or sequence of for-credit coursework or noncredit classes or experiences.
  • Electives

 

Overview of the First Year Curriculum


For both day and evening division students, the first two semesters consist of required courses.

These required courses include two 1-hour courses that provide an introduction to being an effective and professional law student and lawyer (Lawyering Fundamentals), and to the core methods of reading, synthesis, and analysis used throughout law school and legal practice (Legal Methods).

Additionally, the first-year curriculum at the College of Law includes traditional core first-year subjects-Contracts, Torts, Civil Procedure, and Property (part-time division students take Property in the third semester). These areas of law are foundational in several ways: they are critical in the practice of law, they serve as basic building blocks for advanced courses, and they provide doctrinal and practice-area context for developing the skills of legal reasoning and legal analysis.

The first-year curriculum also includes two semesters of Legal Writing and Legal Research. These courses reflect the importance of a strong foundation in writing and research. In addition, Legal Writing and LegalResearch is tied in several ways to the core doctrinal subjects. First, the courses allow us to give direct and explicit attention, at the start of law school, to several areas of basic knowledge and skills that are threaded throughout the entire first year, such as how to read cases and statutes, and how to synthesize a legal rule from multiple sources. Second, at the College of Law, the courses in Legal Writing and Legal Research, concert with the doctrinal courses, will be mutually reinforcing-the work in Legal Writing and Legal Research often will draw on doctrines and issues covered in Contracts, Torts, Civil Procedure, and Property I.

The first year also requires Practice Foundation I: Interviewing and Counseling (this is in the third semester for part-time students). This is the first of three required Practice Foundations courses.

 

Overview of the Upper-Level Requirements


In the second year (semester 3 for day students and semester 4 for evening students), students are required to take: Constitutional Law, Practice Foundations II: Negotiation and Conflict Management, and Property II and Legal Writing III.

Required courses taken in sequence during the latter third of the curriculum are: Constitutional Law II, Capstone I and II (Legal Analysis and Bar Readiness), and Legal Writing III. Other required courses, not taken in sequence are: Evidence or Evidence Practicum and Professional Responsibility.

The J.D. degree includes additional required courses in areas that are widely viewed as part of the knowledge, skills, and understanding that a competent attorney should have. Some of these required courses are included on the bar examination, reflecting the judgment of the State of Texas, through rules adopted by the Texas Supreme Court, about necessary basic knowledge. These courses also introduce students to a range of practice areas, and can form the basis for advanced study in any of these areas.

These required courses are:

  • Business Associations (3 hours)
  • Constitutional Law II (3 hours)
  • Evidence (3 hours) or Evidence Practicum (4 hours)
  • Family Law (3 hours)
  • Professional Responsibility (3 hours)
  • Sale and Secure Transactions “Commercial Law” (3 hours)
  • Wills, Trusts, and Estates (3 hours)
  • ​Capstone I, and II  (3 hours each)
  • Conficts of Law or Remedies (2 hours each)
  • Legal Writing III

 

Overview of the Requirements


In addition to required courses, some required courses contain requirements related to an important skills, experiences, or proficiency that students at the College of Law are expected to attain. Requirements are satisfied through credit-bearing courses, not-for-credit courses or experiences, or demonstrated proficiency.

  • Writing Requirement
  • Research Requirement
  • Skills Requirement
  • Advocacy Requirement
  • Experiential Requirement
  • Practice-Related Technology Requirement

Each of the Requirements relates to important skills, experiences, or proficiencies, that students at the College of Law are expected to attain. The Requirements are not themselves “courses.” Rather, depending on the Requirement, the Requirements are satisfied through credit-bearing courses, not-for-credit courses or experiences, or demonstrated proficiency.

 

The Requirements are:

The Major Writing Requirement. The Major Writing (1) is an experience involving multiple, original writings or a single, lengthy writing, entailing significant synthesis and analysis; the sum total should generally be at least 25 pages; (2) includes the submission and assessment of at least two drafts of each writing (that is, at least one first-draft and a final draft); (3) must be taught (or supervised) by full-time faculty, or other faculty (such as part-time professor of practice, or adjunct professor) with demonstrated ability to supervise a legal writing experience entailing significant synthesis and analysis.  The Registrar will maintain a list of courses containing writing segments approved by the faculty, and writing segments satisfying the upper-level writing experience. 

The Writing Requirement is satisfied by completion of two (2) writing segments. A writing segment is an assignment that correlates in scope and complexity with written work product that lawyers prepare; and on which the student receives assessment. 

 

The Research Requirement. The Research Requirement is satisfied by completion of four to five (4-5) research segments (UBE Required Menu has 4 required research segments. UBE Modified Menu has 5 required research segments). A research segment requires the completion of at least one significant research assignment, which will include a research plan, a research trail, and a research bibliography. To ensure that students become proficient in the foundational information and research abilities required in practice, multiple research segments will address and reinforce knowledge of sources, creation of a research plan, use of multiple platforms for research, maintaining a research trail, and storing information.

 

The Skills Requirement. The Skills Requirement is satisfied by completion of two to three (2-3) skills segments in addition to the skills provided in the required classes of Practice Foundations I and Practice Foundations II. (UBE Required Menu has 2 required skills segments. UBE Modified Menu has 3 required skills segments). A skills segment is a performance or activity in which students are assessed and which requires a student to engage in one or more of the following professional skills, or other skills recognized by the faculty as a possible basis for a skills segment: interviewing, counseling, negotiation, fact development and analysis, trial practice, document drafting, conflict resolution, organization and management of legal work, collaboration, cultural competency and self-evaluation.

 

The Experiential Requirement. To satisfy this Requirement, a student must complete the following:

  1. Completion of at least two courses from any of the following three categories: Practicum, Externship, and Clinic. 
  2. Satisfactory completion of the Community Engagement Program; and
  3. Satisfactory completion of the L.A. Bedford Mentorship Program.

 

The Practice-Related Technology Requirement. 

To satisfy this requirement, students must demonstrate basic proficiency as to practice-related technologies, including case management and time-keeping software; trial and litigation software; word processing; and databases.  Students can satisfy this through completion of an elective that satisfies the requirement, or through successful completion of designated nodules on technology training software that the College of Law has licensed for its students.

The Practice-Related Technology Requirement ensures that students graduate with competence in practice-related technologies.  Competent and effective law practice in all settings entails the ability to use such technologies.  Rule 1.1 of the BA Model Rules of Professional Conduct explains that the requirement of competent representation “requires the legal knowledge, skill, thoroughness and preparation necessary for the representation.  New Comment 8 to this rule notes that competent representation requires a lawyer to “keep abreast of changes in the law and its practice, including the benefits and risks associated with relevant technology.

 

Curricular Requirements (for students matriculating Fall 2020):


 

First-Year “Lockstep” Required Courses


Note: Some of these will occur in the fall semester of the second year for evening-division students.

  • Lawyering Fundamentals (1 hour - occurs before the start of regular class)
  • Civil Procedure (2 semesters, 5 hours total)
  • ​Contracts or Contracts I and II (4 hours total)
  • ​Criminal Law (3 hours)
  • ​Legal Methods (1 hour)
  • Legal Research or Legal Research I and II (2 hours total)
  • Legal Writing (2 semesters, 6 hours total)
  • Practice Foundation I: Interviewing and Counseling (3 hours)
  • Property I (2 hours)
  • Torts or Torts I and II (4 hours total)

 

Second-Year “Lockstep” Required Courses


  • Constitutional Law (4 hours)
  • Practice Foundation II: Negotiation and Conflict Resolution {3 hours)
  • Property II (2 hours)
  • Legal Writing III (3 hours)

 

Other Required Courses


  • Constitutional Law II (3 hours)
  • Evidence (3 hours) or Evidence Practicum (4 hours)
  • ​Professional Responsibility (3 hours)
  • ​Capstone I: Legal Analysis and Bar Readiness (3 hours)
  • Capstone II: Legal Analysis and Bar Readiness(3 hours)

 

UBE Required Menu- 3.00 GPA or greater after the first 2 semesters (day) and first 3 semesters (evening):

  • UBE Family Law (3 hours) or UBE Wills, Trusts, and Estates (3 hours)
  • Business Associations I (3 hours) or UBE Sale and Secure Transactions “Commercial Law” (3 hours)
  • Conflicts of Law (2 hours) or Remedies (2 hours)

 

UBE Enhanced Menu- Less than 3.00 GPA after the first 2 semesters (day) and first 3 semesters (evening):

  • UBE Family Law (3 hours)
  • UBE Wills, Trusts, and Estates (3 hours)
  • Business Associations I (3 hours)
  • UBE Sale and Secure Transactions “Commercial Law” (3 hours)
  • Conflicts of Law (2 hours) or Remedies (2 hours)