Apr 10, 2020  
2018-2019 Catalog: Undergraduate, Graduate, and College of Law 
    
2018-2019 Catalog: Undergraduate, Graduate, and College of Law [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Listings


 

Accounting - Undergraduate

  
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    ACCT 2010 - Accounting Principles I (Financial Accounting)

    3.0-3.0
    TCCNS Number: ACCT 2301 or 2401
    2010 (2301 or 2401). 3 hours. External uses of accounting information; interpretation of accounting data; analysis of financial statements; income and cash flow analysis; nature of assets and liabilities; understanding accounting reporting process. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1680 (or higher level). May not be taken more than twice at UNT Dallas. Students may not retake this course once they have completed (with a C or better) a course for which this is a prerequisite.
  
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    ACCT 2020 - Accounting Principles II (Managerial Accounting)

    3.0-3.0
    TCCNS Number: ACCT 2302 or 2402
    2020 (2302 or 2402). 3 hours. A study of the use of accounting information for business decision making. Topics include: cost behavior analysis, cost-volume-profit relationships, and the identification of costs relevant to the decision making process. Students are introduced to various cost system designs, standard costs, variable costing, operational budgeting, and decision making in decentralized businesses. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2010 with a grade of C or better; MATH 1680 (or higher level). This course may not be taken more than twice at UNT Dallas. Students may not retake this course once they have completed (with a C or better) a course for which this is a prerequisite.
  
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    ACCT 2900 - Special Problems

    1.0-3.0
    2900. 1-3 hours each.
  
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    ACCT 3110 - Intermediate Accounting I

    3.0-3.0
    3110. 3 hours. An in-depth study of the process of preparing and presenting financial information about an entity for outside users (Part I). Topics vary but typically include: standard setting; the accounting cycle including data accumulation, adjustments and preparation of financial statements; and valuation. There is a focus on the recognition, measurement and disclosure of revenue; inventory and cost of sales; and plant assets. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2010 and 2020 with a grades of C or better. May not be taken more than twice at UNT Dallas. Students may not retake this course once they have completed (with a grade of C or better) a course for which this is a prerequisite.
  
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    ACCT 3120 - Intermediate Accounting II

    3.0-3.0
    3120. 3 hours. An in-depth study of the process of preparing and presenting financial information about an entity for outside users (Part II). Topics vary but typically include analysis of recognition, measurement and disclosure of: equity investments, financing activities (bonded debt, leases, pensions), income taxes, stockholders’ equity, specialized reporting problems and cash flow. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 3110; must have a 2.5 GPA in all ACCT 3000-level and ACCT 4000-level courses taken at UNT Dallas, or their equivalents taken at other colleges and universities. May not be taken more than twice at UNT Dallas. Students may not retake this course once they have completed (with a grade of C or better) a course for which this is a prerequisite.
  
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    ACCT 3270 - Cost Accounting

    3.0-3.0
    3270. 3 hours. Accounting in manufacturing operations; cost concepts and classifications; cost accounting cycle; accounting for materials, labor and burden; process cost accounting; budgeting; standard costs; cost reports; direct costing and differential cost analysis. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2010 and 2020 with a grade of C or better; ECON 1100 and 1110; BCIS 2610; and MATH 1190 or MATH 1710 or MATH 1680. May not be taken more than twice at UNT Dallas. Students may not retake this course once they have completed (with a grade of C or better) a course for which this is a prerequisite.
  
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    ACCT 3405 - Professional Development

    1.0-1.0
    3405. 1 hour. Enables students to develop knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to function effectively and succeed in the business world. Topics covered include how to dress for success, confidence and motivation, self-assessment, handling conflict and stress, personal and business ethics, dining etiquette, resume writing, professional certification opportunities, job search and interviewing, and the necessity for continuous self-improvement. In addition to faculty instruction, topics are covered by using former students and other guest lecturers from business, industry and government to expose students to career enhancing opportunities and to provide valuable insights from first-hand experiences. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 3120 (may be taken concurrently). May not be taken more than twice at UNT Dallas.
  
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    ACCT 4100 - Accounting Systems

    3.0-3.0
    4100. 3 hours. Introduction to technology/accounting information systems and their interface with business processes, internal controls, and database management systems. Emphasis on maintaining and auditing system security and integricy development life cycle to the engineering of accounting information systems. Emphasis on auditing system security and integrity. Practical experience with a commercial accounting package and database management software. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 3120 is a corequisite; must have a 2.5 GPA in all ACCT 3000-level and ACCT 4000-level courses taken at UNT Dallas, or their equivalents taken at other colleges and universities. May not be taken more than twice at UNT Dallas. Students may not retake this course once they have completed (with a grade of C or better) a course for which this is a prerequisite.
  
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    ACCT 4130 - Financial Statement Analysis

    3.0-3.0
    4130. 3 hours. Ratio and analysis and interpretation of balance sheet and income statement data. Account classifications and income measurements; company ratios, trends and present position; development of industry standards and status of business indicators as a guide for economic forecasts. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2010 and 2020 with grades of C or better; ECON 1100 and 1110; BCIS 2610. Not open to accounting majors. May not be taken more than twice at UNT Dallas. Students may not retake this course once they have completed (with a C or better) a course for which this is a prerequisite.
  
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    ACCT 4140 - Advanced Accounting Principles

    3.0-3.0
    4140. 3 hours. Problems connected with income determination and equity accounting, and consolidated statements; domestic and foreign branches, and international accounting; statement of affairs; fiduciaries; actuarial science. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 3120 with a grade of C or better. May not be taken more than twice at UNT Dallas.
  
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    ACCT 4270 - Advanced Cost Accounting

    3.0-3.0
    4270. 3 hours. Nature, measurement and analysis of accounting data appropriate to managerial decision making, and comprehensive budgeting; statistical cost estimation; cost-volume-profit analysis; gross profit analysis; application of probability to cost control; capital planning. PERT-cost. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 3270 with a grade of C or better. May not be taken more than twice at UNT Dallas.
  
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    ACCT 4300 - Federal Income Taxation

    3.0-3.0
    4300. 3 hours. A comprehensive introduction to the U.S. federal income tax system. Emphasizes the taxation of individuals but many topics also apply to business entities. Coverage includes technical tax rules and motivations behind these rules, as well as tax planning opportunities and limitations. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2010 and 2020 with grades of C or better. May not be taken more than twice at UNT Dallas.
  
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    ACCT 4350 - Advanced Federal Income Taxation

    3.0-3.0
    4350. 3 hours. Introduction to federal taxation of corporations and partnerships, emphasizing the tax compliance and research process. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 4300.
  
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    ACCT 4400 - Auditing Professional Responsibilities

    3.0-3.0
    4400. 3 hours. Introduction to auditing and the professional responsibilities of a career in any specialty of the accounting profession. Topics include the legal and ethical responsibilities of accountants; professional auditing standards; the acquisition, evaluation and documentation of audit evidence; reports on the results of the engagement. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 3120 and 4100. Must have a 2.5 GPA in all ACCT 3000-level and ACCT 4000-level courses taken at UNT Dallas, or their equivalents taken at other colleges and universities. May not be taken more than twice at UNT Dallas.
  
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    ACCT 4410 - Auditing Evidence

    3.0-3.0
    4410. 3 hours. The investigation of accounting information. This is an introductory course in all aspects of the investigative process in auditing. Topics include evaluation in internal control, compliance testing, substantive testing, operational audits, statistical sampling and auditing EDP. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 4400 with a grade of C or better; DSCI 3710. May not be taken more than twice at UNT Dallas.
  
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    ACCT 4420 - International Accounting

    3.0-3.0
    4420. 3 hours. Integrates the functional areas of accounting and demonstrates how accounting relates to the disciplines in the College of Business Administration core. Cross-functional and global approaches to organizational issues are emphasized. Enhances the ability of students to think critically, and to develop knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to compete effectively in the global business world. Topics covered include: multinational strategy, global perspectives in accounting, environmental, social and political influences on accounting, accounting information systems in a multinational enterprise, performance evaluation in a multinational enterprise, and the exploration of timely topical issues such as NAFTA, the European Union, and the globalization of securities markets. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 4100 with a grade of C or better. May not be taken more than twice at UNT Dallas.
  
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    ACCT 4800 - Internship

    3.0-3.0
    4800. 3 hours. Supervised work in a job relative to student’s career objective. Prerequisite(s): Student must meet the employer’s requirements and have consent of the professional program director. May be repeated, but only 3 hours may apply toward degree program credit.
  
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    ACCT 4900 - Special Problems

    1.0-3.0
    4900. 1-3 hours each.

Accounting - Graduate

  
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    ACCT 5020 - Accumulation and Analysis of Accounting Data

    3.0-3.0
    5020. 3 hours. Provides an understanding of accounting procedures and concepts utilized by management in making decisions. Basic concepts and techniques of accounting; the role of an accounting system in business operations and management; preparation and interpretation of financial reports. This course meets the deficiency requirement in accounting for MBA candidates and may be counted as part of a graduate program in a field other than business administration. May not be taken for credit if ACCT 2010 and 2020 or the equivalent has been taken and a grade of C or better was earned. Offered in Fall only.
  
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    ACCT 5110 - Fundamentals of Accounting Research

    3.0-3.0
    5110. 3 hours. Course objectives include the following: 1) Develop student skills at recognizing accounting problems and isolating relevant issues; 2) Develop student skills to generate documentary support and arguments for an acceptable solution to a complex accounting problem; 3) Enhance student skills in effectively organizing and communicating, in written and oral form, proposed solutions to accounting problems; and 4) Familiarize students with contemporary accounting practice. Offered in Spring only. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Accounting MBA Concentration.
  
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    ACCT 5120 - Using Information Systems in Accounting

    3.0-3.0
    5120. 3 hours. This course is designed to enhance a student’s understanding of the role of accounting information systems and their functions in business. Further, students will develop computer skills in applications for all accounting disciplines. Upon completion of the course, students will understand how accounting information systems facilitate the accomplishment of strategic and operational objectives within the organization. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 4400 or consent of instructor.
  
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    ACCT 5130 - Accounting for Management

    3.0-3.0
    5130. 3 hours. Designed to provide an understanding of managerial accounting data in making business decisions. Cases, readings and projects are used to examine a wide variety of managerial topics. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 5020 (or ACCT 2010 and 2020 taken during undergraduate degree). For students not seeking a BBA with a major in accounting. Offered in Spring only.
  
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    ACCT 5150 - The Development of Accounting Theory

    3.0-3.0
    5150. 3 hours. The theory of accounting as it has developed in the economy of the United States. Particular emphasis on concepts, income measurement, valuation of assets, and valuation and measurement of equities. Application of accounting theory to contemporary problems is analyzed by cases and research papers on selected areas. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Accounting MBA Concentration.
  
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    ACCT 5200 - Professional Ethics and Corporate Governance

    3.0-3.0
    5200. 3 hours. This course will examine professional ethics from both a philosophical and business perspective. Ethical reasoning, moral character and decision making will provide a framework for an examining of the importance of ethics in an individual’s personal life and professional career. This course will also explore the concept of corporate governance and the direction business entities are taking in establishing a sound governance framework. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MBA program.
  
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    ACCT 5300 - Federal Taxation of Income

    3.0-3.0
    5300. 3 hours. Comprehensive introduction to the U.S. federal income tax system. Emphasizes the taxation of individuals but many topics also apply to business entities. Coverage includes technical tax rules and motivations behind these rules, as well as tax planning opportunities and limitations. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Accounting MBA Concentration.
  
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    ACCT 5310 - Tax Research and Administrative Procedure

    3.0-3.0
    5310. 3 hours. The objectives of this course are to develop the technical and research skills needed to address contemporary tax issues. Students will learn to identify tax issues, formulate research questions, and develop the research skills needed to address them. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to use the major tax services, evaluate the relevant authorities, and communicate their findings in a professionally written research memorandum. This course also familiarizes students with federal tax policies and procedures, and the authorities that govern tax practice by tax professionals. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 5300 (4300), ACCT 4400, and acceptance into the MBA graduate program.
  
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    ACCT 5320 - Taxation of Flow-Through Entities

    3.0-3.0
    5320. 3 hours. A comprehensive study of federal income taxation of partnerships, S corporations, fiduciaries and their owners / beneficiaries. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 5310 (may be taken concurrently).
  
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    ACCT 5370 - Family Tax Planning

    3.0-3.0
    5370. 3 hours. A comprehensive study of federal estate and gift taxation, as well as advanced family tax planning issues. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 5310 and 5320.
  
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    ACCT 5380 - Forensic Accounting and Fraud Examination

    3.0-3.0
    5380. 3 hours. Provides an overview of forensic accounting and fraud examination. Topics include fraud detection, fraud investigation, and accounting data analysis techniques. Fundamental legal concepts governing expert witness testimony and the handling and admissibility of evidence are examined.
  
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    ACCT 5450 - Seminar in Internal Auditing

    3.0-3.0
    5450. 3 hours. A study of the theory and practice of internal auditing. The course examines the difference between internal and external auditing, focusing on such issues as independence, audit scope, reporting and human relations. Specific internal audit topics include operational auditing, audit administration, planning and supervision, and internal audit reporting. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 4100 and 4400.
  
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    ACCT 5470 - Auditing Advanced Theory

    3.0-3.0
    5470. 3 hours. A conceptual approach to the auditing process, stressing the interrelations of objectives, standards, techniques and procedures. Current topics, including significant legal cases, are included. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Accounting MBA Concentration.

Anthropology - Undergraduate

  
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    ANTH 2900 - Special Problems

    1.0-3.0
    2900. 1-3 hours each.
  
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    ANTH 4900 - Special Problems

    1.0-3.0
    4900. 1-3 hours each.

Applied Economics - Undergraduate

  
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    AECO 2900 - Special Problems

    1.0-3.0
    2900. 1-3 hours each.
  
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    AECO 4080 - Principles of Economic and Community Development

    3.0-3.0
    4080. 3 hours. Presents a broad, interdisciplinary perspective on the local and regional economic development process. Topics include economic base analysis, industrial targeting and recruitment, tax incentives and economic impact analysis.
  
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    AECO 4090 - The Political Economy of Texas

    3.0-3.0
    4090. 3 hours. Interdisciplinary survey of the demographic, political and economic forces influencing Texas’ emergence as a modern industrial state. Topics include Texas’ fiscal and regulatory environments, human capital needs, and relationship with the federal government.

Applied Economics - Graduate

  
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    AECO 5050 - Seminar in Contemporary Applied Economic Problems

    1.0-3.0
    5050. 1-3 hours each. Analysis and discussion of significant contemporary issues in economics and public policy. May be repeated for credit.

Applied Gerontology - Undergraduate

  
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    AGER 2250 - Images of Aging in Film and Literature

    3.0-3.0
    2250. 3 hours. Study of attitudes toward aging through depictions of the elderly in English-language films and literary works. A major goal of the course is to replace stereotypical views of the elderly with an understanding of the variety of human experience in the last decades of life. Satisfies the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the University Core Curriculum.
  
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    AGER 2900 - Special Problems

    1.0-3.0
    2900. 1-3 hours each.
  
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    AGER 4500 - Long-Term Care Case Management with Older Adults

    3.0-3.0
    4500. 3 hours. This practitioner-oriented course focuses on the foundations of case/care management and the care management process as practiced with impaired elderly clients and their family caregivers. Topics include older client intake and assessment, establishing goals and a plan of care, coordinating and linking services and resources, and managing and monitoring care. Situations commonly encountered with at-risk elders are examined using protocols.
  
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    AGER 4550 - Sociology of Aging

    3.0-3.0
    4550. 3 hours. Twenty-somethings, generation Xers, baby boomersall will be senior citizens sooner or later. Their sex, race/ethnicity and social class will affect their experience of aging. Course explores issues related to successful aging, including what young adults should be doing now to ensure that they have happy, healthy, wealthy and creative golden years. Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1510 or equivalent. (Same course as SOCI 4550.)
  
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    AGER 4560 - Minority Aging

    3.0-3.0
    4560. 3 hours. Introduction to the study of minority elderly in the United States, including their physical and mental health, income security, family relations, and service issues. Course content focuses on African-American, Asian/Pacific Islander, Hispanic, and Native American elders.
  
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    AGER 4750 - Sexuality and Aging

    3.0-3.0
    4750. 3 hours. One of the most pervasive myths of aging is that older people are non-sexual. This course challenges popular stereotypes and examines sexual attitudes, activity and behavior as people age. In addition to common social beliefs and attitudes that may affect the opportunity for sexual expression among older adults, biological changes and sexual response are explored, as are other aspects of intimacy important to aging individuals.
  
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    AGER 4780 - Aging Programs and Services

    3.0-3.0
    4780. 3 hours. Introduction to the history of social policy in aging; derivations and directions of public policy, interrelationships of agencies; discussion of selected programs and services for the aged.
  
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    AGER 4900 - Special Problems

    1.0-3.0
    4900. 1-3 hours each.

Art - Undergraduate

  
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    ART 1300 - Art Appreciation for Non-Art Majors

    3.0-3.0
    TCCNS Number: ARTS 1301
    1300 (ARTS 1301). 3 hours. Introduction to basic concepts and vocabularies of the visual arts worldwide, designed to expand aesthetic growth and involvement with the visual world. Satisfies the Creative Arts requirement of the University Core Curriculum.
  
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    ART 1303 - Survey of Art History I

    3.0-3.0
    TCCNS Number: ARTS 1303
    1303 (ARTS 1303) 3 hours. Survey of visual art from Prehistoric to 14th Century. Involves the synthesis and interpretation of artistic expression and invites critical, creative and innovative communication about works of art. Satisfies the Creative Arts requirement of the University Core Curriculum.
  
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    ART 1304 - Survey of Art History II

    3.0-3.0
    TCCNS Number: ARTS 1304
    1304 (ARTS 1304) 3 hours. Survey of visual art from the 14th Century to the 21st Century. Involves the synthesis and interpretation of artistic expression and invites critical, creative and innovative communication about works of art. Satisfies the Creative Arts requirement of the University Core Curriculum.
  
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    ART 1305 - Digital Manipulated Photography

    1.0-1.0
    1305. 1 hour. Introduction to basic concepts and vocabularies of digitally manipulated photography, designed to expand aesthetic growth and involvement with the visual world.
  
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    ART 2900 - Special Problems

    1.0-3.0
    2900. 1-3 hours each. Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

Art Education and Art History - Undergraduate

  
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    AEAH 1750 - Visual Arts Integration

    1.0-1.0
    1750. 1 hour (0;2). An exploration of planning for meaningful visual art integration within early childhood and elementary education, experimentation with a variety of media and processes, along with an appreciation of a variety of art forms. Satisfies a portion of the Component Area Option requirement of the University Core Curriculum.
  
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    AEAH 2900 - Special Problems

    1.0-3.0
    2900. 1-3 hours each.
  
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    AEAH 3750 - Children and Art

    3.0-3.0
    3750. 3 hours. (2;4) An exploration of the elements and principles of art; experimentation with a variety of art media as related to the theories of creative development and an appreciation of a variety of visual art forms. Concurrent enrollment in lecture/lab component required.

Bilingual and ESL Education - Undergraduate

  
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    EDBE 3470 - Foundations of Bilingual and English as Second Language Education

    3.0-3.0
    3470. 3 hours. Examination of philosophies and theoretical underpinnings of bilingual and ESL education, including a review of historical antecedents of bilingual education and evolution of federal and state language policies governing the education of language-minority children. Required for students seeking EC-6 certification with specialization in bilingual or ESL education and for all students seeking 4-8 certification. May be taken concurrently with EDBE 3480.
  
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    EDBE 3480 - Bilingualism and Multiculturism for English Language Learning : Issues and Perspectives

    3.0-3.0
    3480. 3 hours. Study of the bilingual / ESL learner; perspectives on multiculturism; discussions of cognitive, social and affective factors impacting second language development; insights into education in a pluralistic society. Three lecture hours a week. Required for students seeking EC-6 certification with specialization in bilingual or ESL education and for all students seeking 4-8 certification. May be taken concurrently with EDBE 3470.
  
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    EDBE 4470 - Curriculum and Assessment for Bilingual/ESL Education

    3.0-3.0
    4470. 3 hours. Examination of the organization of curriculum for second language learners with special focus on testing and evaluation procedures appropriate for bilingual and ESL classrooms; study of formal and informal assessment of language proficiency for instructional purposes and use of standardized achievement tests. Three lecture hours a week. Course required for students in grades EC-4 or 4-8 generalist certification with specialization in bilingual or ESL education. Prerequisite(s): EDBE 3470 and EDBE 3480; admission to Teacher Education or permission of department. May be taken concurrently with EDBE 4490.
  
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    EDBE 4480 - Bilingual Approaches to Content-Based Learning

    3.0-3.0
    4480. 3 hours. Study of appropriate first language usage in bilingual classrooms, focusing on different core curriculum areas, methods and materials and review of language distribution strategies. Focus on responsive instruction that makes use of effective communication techniques and instructional strategies that actively involve students in the learning process. Required for students seeking EC-6 certification with specialization in bilingual education. Requires 10 hours of field experience in a bilingual education classroom. Language of instruction is Spanish. Placement through departmental Spanish proficiency exam. Prerequisite(s): EDBE 3470 and EDBE 3480; admission to Teacher Education or consent of department.
  
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    EDBE 4490 - Teaching ESL EC-12: Instructional Strategies and Resources

    3.0-3.0
    4490. 3 hours. Study of methods and techniques of teaching English as a second language in elementary and secondary schools; language development techniques and materials for students at different levels of English proficiency. The course focuses on helping students to develop strategies (consistent with state standards for language and content learning) that can improve the English language proficiency and grade level subject matter knowledge of English language learners. Three lecture hours a week. Required for students seeking grades EC-6 generalist certification with specialization in bilingual or ESL education or 4-8 certification with mathematics/ESL, science/ESL, social studies/ESL or reading/LA/ESL or special education. Requires 10 hours of field experiences. Prerequisite(s): EDBE 3470 and LING 4030; admission to Teacher Education or consent of department. May be taken concurrently with EDBE 4470.
  
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    EDBE 4900 - Special Problems

    1.0-3.0
    4900. 1-3 hours each.

Bilingual and ESL Education - Graduate

  
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    EDBE 5560 - Fundamentals of Bilingual and English as a Second Language Education in EC-12

    3.0-3.0
    5560. 3 hours. Examination of historical and legal aspects of bilingual and English as a second language education in EC-12 settings, including program models for the education of English language learners; also, an overview of theories of second language learning and their implications for practice in schools. A minimum of 10 hours of observations are required. Three lecture hours a week. Prerequisite(s): Consent of department.
  
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    EDBE 5570 - Assessing Language & Content Learning in EC-12 Bilingual and English as a Second Language Education

    3.0-3.0
    5570. 3 hours. Examination of issues related to assessment of language proficiency and cognitive abilites of EC-12 English language learners, including the importance of appropriate diagnostic testing to the teaching and learning process; also, a review of potential cultural bias in EC-12 assessment; procedures for assessing eligibility of EC-12 students for special language programs. Prerequisite(s): EDBE 5560 or consent of department.
  
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    EDBE 5580 - Bilingual Content Instruction

    3.0-3.0
    5580. 3 hours. Study of curriculum, materials and pedagogy applicable to bilingual classrooms. Attention is given to the integrated teaching of mathematics and the social and natural sciences in bilingual classrooms, emphasizing research-based methods that use the learner’s first language for content instruction.This course is taught in Spanish. Prerequisite(s): EDBE 5560 or consent of department. Designed for bilingual, post-baccalaureate teacher certification students.
  
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    EDBE 5582 - ESL Content Instruction

    3.0-3.0
    5582. 3 hours. Study of subject-specific instructional methods, approaches, and materials to teach mathematics, science, English language arts and social studies to students for whom English is a second language. Thirty (30) hours of field experiences in ESL classrooms are required for students seeking certification in ESL education. Prerequisite(s): EDBE 5560 or consent of department.
  
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    EDBE 5590 - Pedagogy of English as Second Language for EC-12 Classrooms

    3.0-3.0
    5590. 3 hours. Examination of appropriate procedures and materials for academic content instruction and language development for English Language Learners (ELLs). Topics to be explored include structured and unstructured tecniques for teaching ELLs, the relationship between oral language development and literacy skills, the development of literacy skills in English for students who are not literate in the first language and methods for effective sheltered English instruction. Emphasis placed on inclusion of all learners. Prerequisite(s): EDBE 5560 or consent of department.
  
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    EDBE 5600 - Sociocultural Foundations of Bilingual and ESL Education

    3.0-3.0
    5600. 3 hours. Study of sociolinguistic and sociocultural theory and methodology, with special emphasis on their applicability to linguistically and culturally diverse educational contexts and communities.
  
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    EDBE 5650 - Academic Spanish in the Bilingual Classroom

    3.0-3.0
    5650. 3 hours. Focus on the use of academic Spanish in bilingual classrooms, including Spanish writing conventions, genres, and grammar. Attention is given to Spanish language systems and applications as well as to classroom pedagogy. This course is taught in Spanish.
  
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    EDBE 5660 - English Language Acquisition by Spanish Speakers : Theories and Methods

    3.0-3.0
    5660. 3 hours. Considering that many ELLs have a Spanish speaking background, this class will focus on the identification and explanation of the nature and origin of different types of errors as well as on an overview of their English second language acquisition process. Practical analysis of oral and written English samples will be given as well as an overview of methods and strategies to help error correction. During the course, students will also acquire the most common Spanish phrases and vocabulary used in the classroom setting. Prerequisite(s): Admission to graduate school.
  
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    EDBE 5900 - Special Problems

    1.0-3.0
    5900. 1-3 hours.

Biochemistry - Undergraduate

  
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    BIOC 2900 - Introduction to Biochemical Research

    1.0-3.0
    2900. 1-3 hours each. Individualized laboratory instruction. Students may begin training on laboratory research techniques. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1430 (may be taken concurrently) and consent of instructor. For elective credit only; may not be substituted for required chemistry courses.
  
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    BIOC 3300 - Elementary Biochemistry

    3.0-3.0
    3300. 3 hours. Chemistry of biomolecules; amino acids, proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleotides, nucleic acids, vitamins and coenzymes; metabolism of biomolecules, generation and utilization of energy. Counts toward chemistry minor for biology majors. For students needing one semester biochemistry course. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 2370, CHEM 2380, CHEM 3210, CHEM 3220.

Biology - Undergraduate

  
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    BIOL 1082 - Biology for Educators

    3.0-3.0
    1082. 3 hours (3;3). Develop a meaningful and functional command of key biological concepts; an understanding of the interrelationships among all living things; and a correlation between what pre-service teachers are required to learn and what they will be required to teach. Includes laboratory. This is a general biology course with laboratory designated for elementary and middle school education majors for seeking teacher certification. May be used to satisfy a portion of the Life and Physical Sciences requirement of the University Core Curriculum, with the exception of School of Liberal Arts and Sciences majors.
  
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    BIOL 1132 - Environmental Science

    3.0-3.0
    TCCNS Number: BIOL 2406
    1132 (2406). 3 hours (3;2). Interdisciplinary approach to understanding basic concepts in environmental science including critical scientific thought, biodiversity, resource management, pollution, global climate change, resource consumption and population growth. Emphasis on how these concepts affect and are affected by human society. Includes laboratory. May not be counted towards a major in biology. May be used to satisfy a portion of the Life and Physical Sciences requirement of the University Core Curriculum.
  
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    BIOL 1300 - Biology for Non Majors

    3.0-3.0
    TCCNS Number: BIOL 1308
    1300 (1308). 3 hours. Introduction to the science of biology including: the structure and function of cells, tissues and organs, cellular processes, cell division, principles of inheritance, evolution, the diversity of life, and ecology. Includes a laboratory component. Satisfies a portion of the Life and Physical Sciences requirement of the University Common Core.
  
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    BIOL 1710 - Biology for Science Majors I

    3.0-3.0
    TCCNS Number: BIOL 1306
    1710 (1306). 3 hours. (3;0;1) An integrated approach to cell and molecular biology with an emphasis on biological chemistry, cell structure and function, Mendelian and molecular genetics, and evolutionary biology. For students preparing for advanced study in the biological sciences. Prerequisite(s): Course should be taken concurrently with BIOL 1730. Satisfies a portion of the Life and Physical Sciences requirement of the University Core Curriculum.
  
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    BIOL 1720 - Biology for Science Majors II

    3.0-3.0
    TCCNS Number: BIOL 1307
    1720 (1307). 3 hours. An integrated approach to the anatomical, physiological and functional aspects of nutrition, gas exchange, transport, reproduction, development, regulation, response and ecology of microorganisms, plants and animals. Required of all biology majors. For students preparing for advanced study in the biological sciences. Prerequisite(s): Course should be taken concurrently with BIOL 1740. Satisfies a portion of the Life and Physical Sciences requirement of the University Core Curriculum.
  
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    BIOL 1730 - Biology for Science Majors I Laboratory

    1.0-1.0
    TCCNS Number: BIOL 1106
    1730 (1106). 1 hour. (0;3) Laboratory techniques for BIOL 1710. Prerequisite(s): Credit for or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 1710. Satisfies a portion of the Component Area Option requirement of the University Core Curriculum.
  
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    BIOL 1740 - Biology for Science Majors II Laboratory

    1.0-1.0
    TCCNS Number: BIOL 1107
    1740 (1107). 1 hour. (0;3) Laboratory techniques for BIOL 1720. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1710/1730 and credit for or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 1720. Satisfies a portion of the Component Area Option requirement of the University Core Curriculum.
  
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    BIOL 2041 - Microbiology

    3.0-3.0
    TCCNS Number: BIOL 2321
    2041 (2321). 3 hours. Survey of the microbial world; classification, ecology, morphology and physiology of eukaryotic and prokaryotic mircroorganisms. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1710/1730 and credit for, or concurrent enrollment in, BIOL 1720/1740.
  
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    BIOL 2042 - Microbiology Laboratory

    1.0-1.0
    TCCNS Number: BIOL 2121
    2042 (2121). 1 hour (0;4). Laboratory techniques in general microbiology. Survey of microorganisms including bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and algae. Culture, staining, and identification of bacteria. Prerequisite(s): Credit for or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 2041 and CHEM 1420.
  
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    BIOL 2301 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I

    3.0-3.0
    TCCNS Number: BIOL 2301
    2301 (2301). 3 hours. Functional anatomy and physiology of the human body including biological chemistry, cell morphology, membrane and tissue physiology, musculoskeletal system and the nervous system. For kinesiology, dance majors and allied health students. Prerequisite(s): Credit for or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 2311.
  
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    BIOL 2302 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II

    3.0-3.0
    TCCNS Number: BIOL 2302
    2302 (2302). 3 hours. Functional anatomy and physiology of the human body including the endocrine, digestive, respiratory, cardiovascular, urinary, and reproductive systems. For kinesiology, dance majors and allied health students. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2301/2311 and credit for or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 2312.
  
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    BIOL 2311 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory

    1.0-1.0
    TCCNS Number: BIOL 2101
    2311 (2101). 1 hour. Laboratory studies examiningthe functional anatomy and physiology of the human body including cell morphology, tissue histology, musculoskeletal anatomy and nervous system anatomy. For kinesiology, dance majors and allied health students. Prerequisite(s): Credit for or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 2301.
  
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    BIOL 2312 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory

    1.0-1.0
    TCCNS Number: BIOL 2102
    2312 (2102). 1 hour. Laboratory studies examining the functional anatomy and physiology of the human body including the endocrine, digestive, respiratory, cardiovascular, urinary and reproductive systems. For kinesiology, dance majors and allied health students. Prerequisite(s): Credit for or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 2302.
  
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    BIOL 2900 - Special Problems

    1.0-3.0
    2900. 1-3 hours each. Individual readings and laboratory research projects in the biological sciences.
  
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    BIOL 3090 - Mentored Undergraduate Research

    3.0-3.0
    3090. 3 hours. Introduction to research methods for undergraduates including proposal preparation, literature review, independent mentored study and investigation with appropriate methodology, and scientific dissemination of results. Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.
  
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    BIOL 3310 - Principles of Human Nutrition

    3.0-3.0
    3310. 3 hours. Principles of human nutrition including digestion and absorption of macronutrients, role of vitamins and minerals, energy metabolism, nutrition assessment, diet planning, food safety and life span nutrition. Emphasis on food choices that promote health and prevent diet-related diseases. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1710 or BIOL 1720; or permission of instructor.
  
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    BIOL 3320 - Principles of Ecology

    3.0-3.0
    3320. 3 hours. Ecological and evolutionary approach to understanding distribution, abundance, dispersion and form-function diversity of organisms. Focus on organisms, their physiological and life history adaptations, and populations. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1710/1730 and 1720/1740 or equivalent.
  
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    BIOL 3331 - Biomedical Criminalistics

    3.0-3.0
    3331. 3 hours. Survey of the various forensic sciences with emphasis on direct examinatio of human remains and directly related biological evidence; e.g. anthropologhy, pathology, odontology. Students learn how cases arise; i.e. how remains are located, recovered, and processed. Supporting biological, clinical, and physical sciences will also be covered; e.g. toxicology, entomology, DNA science, forensic geology/palynology, and remote sensing. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1710 or 1720.
  
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    BIOL 3451 - Genetics

    3.0-3.0
    3451. 3 hours. Genetic structure and inheritance in viruses, bacteria and higher organisms with emphasis on gene biochemistry, Mendelian genetics and population genetics. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1710/1730, BIOL 1720/1740, CHEM 1410/1430, CHEM 1420/1440. It is also recommended that students take at least one 2000-level BIOL course as well as concurrent enrollment in CHEM 2370; however, these are not required. It is also recommended that students take at least one 2000-level BIOL course as well as concurrent enrollment in CHEM 2370; however these are not required.
  
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    BIOL 3452 - Genetics Laboratory

    1.0-1.0
    3452. 1 hour. (0;4) Laboratory studies examining classical transmission genetics and modern molecular genetics. Heavy emphasis on experimental crosses and application of molecular genetics. Prerequisite(s): Credit for or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 3451.
  
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    BIOL 3510 - Cell Biology

    3.0-3.0
    3510. 3 hours. Structure and function of animal and plant cells with emphasis on cell membranes, cytoplasmic organelles and the nucleus. Prerequisite(s): 8 hours of organic chemistry or equivalent; BIOL 1710 and BIOL 1720; Admission to the biology major; or consent of department.
  
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    BIOL 3520 - Cell Biology Laboratory

    1.0-1.0
    3520. 1 hour. (0;2.5) Laboratory studies emphasizing the isolation and characterization of subcellular organelles. Prerequisite(s): Credit for or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 3510.
  
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    BIOL 4080 - Radiation Safety

    1.0-1.0
    4080. 1 hour. (1;0) Radiation sources, interaction of radiation with matter and human tissues, radiation measurement and dosage, instrumentation, regulations and practical safety procedures. Meets state training requirements for use of radioactive isotopes or radiation producing equipment. Prerequisite(s): 12 hours of biology, chemistry, or physics, or combination of the three.
  
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    BIOL 4120 - Environmental Chemistry

    3.0-3.0
    4120. 3 hours. Presents a scientific overview of environmental contaminants, their occurance, sources and impact on humans and the environment. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1410/1430; CHEM 1420/1440; or consent of department.
  
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    BIOL 4220 - Neuropsychopharmacology

    3.0-3.0
    4220. 3 hours. Comprehensive examination of the physiological effects of major psychotropic drug classes that affect the central nervous system, including the interactions between neurotransmitter systems and physiology; neuroanatomical pathways and behavior; synaptic functions and behavioral disorders. Open to all majors. Prerequisite(s): Junior standing.
  
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    BIOL 4240 - Forensic Microscopy

    3.0-3.0
    4240. 3 hours (2;4). Introduction to microscopic analysis with emphasis on the fundamentals necessary for identification and characterization of trace evidence materials such as glass, hair, fibers, explosives, soil, paint and biological samples. Prerequiste(s): Successful completion of a minimum of 60 semester hours; 8 hours organic chemistry; CJUS 3330; BIOL 3331; BIOL 3451/3452; or consent of department.
  
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    BIOL 4250 - Pharmacology

    3.0-3.0
    4250. 3 hours. An overview of pharmacology based on principles of drug action; emphasis on drugs by class, and not specific drugs per se. General principles, antibiotics and pharmacology of the autonomic, cardiovascular, central nervous and endocrine systems. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1710/1730; BIOL 1720/1740; BIOL 2041/2042; BIOL 2302/2312; or consent of department.
  
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    BIOL 4260 - Principles of Evolution

    3.0-3.0
    4260. 3 hours. Population genetics; ecological, geographical and historical concepts of evolution. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3451 or equivalent.
  
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    BIOL 4330 - Developmental Biology

    3.0-3.0
    4330. 3 hours. Mechanisms of development, differentiation, and growth in animals at the molecular, cellular, and genetic levels. Areas of particular emphasis include transcriptional control mechanisms, embryonic patterning, cell-cell interactions, growth factors and signal transduction, and regulatory hierarchies. Coverage also includes the roles that environmental factors play in development, the medical applications of our knowledge of development, and the roles that development plays in evolution. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1710/1730; BIOL 1720/1740; BIOL 2041/2042; BIOL 2302/2312; or consent of department.
  
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    BIOL 4340 - Urban Ecology

    3.0-3.0
    4340. 3 hours. A comparative study of the patterns and processes of the relationships of living organisms, including human beings, with each other and their surroundings in the context of an urban environment. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1710 and BIOL 1720.
 

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